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Cambridge 2012 Poster Sessions

Abstracts have been sorted alphabetically by first author for each day, and are listed by at the foot of the page: click on the title to jump to the abstract. Day One | Day Two

Day One

# Authors Title
1 M. Birkett
School of Computing, Engineering & Information Sciences, Northumbria University
Using CES EduPak to select Alternative Materials for The Greenpower Electric Car
2 C. Bream, N. Ball, C. Cesaretto
Granta Design
Estimation and modelling tools for advanced teaching and research
3 T. Bullough1,2, T. Novoselova1,2,  A. Mannis1,2 and
A. Green3
1 Centre for Engineering Education, School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, UK
2 UK Centre for Materials Education
3 Materials e-learning Technologies Ltd
Open Educational Resources for the Materials and Engineering Teaching Communities (CORE-Materials and CORE-SET)
4 J.P. Chevalier
C M Research and Technology, Ecole Centrale de Marseille, France
Detailed design brief before pre dimensioning a technical system
5 J. Dehn
Kingston University, School of Design, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture
REMATERIALISE: the value of a physical sustainable materials library embedded within education
6 M.H. Endean, K. Clay, S.J. Burnley and A. Goodyear
Dept. of Design, Development, Environment and Materials, Faculty of Maths, Computing & Technology, The Open University
Product re-engineering for enhanced end-of-life performance: A residential school activity for undergraduate engineering students
7 X. Frontere and R. Doue
Granta Design
Introducing materials and sustainability in pre-university curricula with CES EduPack
8 M. Fry and T. Götte
Granta Design
From Design to Science: An Educational Resource on ‘NEU’ Materials to Inspire and Motivate Students
9 A. Goodyear and M.H. Endean
Dept. of Design, Development, Environment and Materials, Faculty of Maths, Computing & Technology,
The Open University
Residential school modules and their role in distance learning for undergraduate engineering
10 P. Guttmann, G. Pilz, and F. Röper
Department Polymer Engineering and Science,
Chair of Materials Science and Testing of Plastics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, A
Consideration of Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers for Materials Selection
11 M. Hsieh and H. Melia
Granta Design
Granta Design's Teaching Resources Website
12 K. Konstantopoulou, T. Palacios, E. Tejado, A. Ridruejo, and J. Y. Pastor
Department of Materials Science, Technical University of Madrid
Classroom experiments in the new degree of Materials Science and Engineering at UPM
13 J. Orozco1, T. Guraya2, J. Ibarretxe2, L. Cabedo3, J. Gómez3, R. Izquierdo3, D. Sales4, D.  González4, P. Lopez-Crespo5, M. Segarra6, N. Salan7, G. Olivella8
1 Universitat Politècnica de València
2 Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
3 Universidad Jaime I
4 Universidad de Cádiz
5 Universidad de Málaga
6 Universitat de Barcelona
7 Universidad Politècnica de Catalunya
8 Granta Design Ltd
Inter-university network for Innovation in Materials Science Teaching
14 R. Rajendran
School of Mechanical and Building Sciences, B S Abdur Rahman University, India
Material Science through activity based learning
15 N.A. Rutter, Z.H. Barber and T.W. Clyne
Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK
Online Materials Teaching and Learning Resources: DoITPoMS
16 T. Rüütmann and H. Kipper
Tallinn University of Technology, Estoni
Life-Long Learning Programme for Engineers in Engineering Pedagogy
17 A. Silva1,2 and M. Fontul1
1 Dept. Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon,Portugal
2 Granta Design
Teaching design in the first years of a traditional mechanical engineering degree: methods, issues and future perspectives
18 R. Wallach1, A. Pereira2, and A. Silva2
1 Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK
2 Granta Design
Sharing experiences with Engineering Materials projects
19

S. Warde1, D. Cebon1,2, and J. Goddin1
1. Granta Design
2.
University of Cambridge

GRANTA MI - A Framework for Capturing and Re-Using Research Data
20 T. Zamenopoulos
Faculty of Maths, Computing and Technology,
The Open University
The use (and abuse) of CES EduPack in distant design education
21 O. Zanellato, P. Lefrancois, Z. Hadjem-Hamouche, A. Ikhlef, J. Bechet, J-P. Chevalier
Département Matériaux industriels, CNAM, Paris
A first assessment of distant learning in the field of materials science


Day Two

  Authors Title
22 M. Ashby, A. Silva
Granta Design
Deciding on Low-Carbon Power Systems: Materials and Energy Criteria
23 T. Ben1, D. L. Sales1, L. López2, P. Perdomo2,
F. M. Morales1, N. Baladés1, D. González1 and R. García1
1 Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz
2 Departamento de Organización de Empresas, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Cádiz
CES EduPack: a tool for entrepreneurship Education
24 B.Bokshteyn, A.Rodin, O.Ushakova
National University of Science and Technology, MISiS, Russia
International Master Programs at National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”
25 B.Bokshteyn, A.Rodin, O.Ushakova
National University of Science and Technology, MISiS, Russia
Master's Program "Advanced Materials Science"
26 L. Brown, A. Pereira
Granta Design
Resources to Support Bio-engineering and Biological Materials Education
27 A. Drazin
Department of Anthropology, University College London
The Questions Posed by Materials for Design Anthropology Education
28 U. Fekken
Hanzehogeschool Groningen
The four quadrant method in teaching
29 D. Ferrer-Balas
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Delivering Engineers for a Sustainable World. How to change towards sustainable universities?
30 R. Ilola, T. Kiesi, H. Hänninen
Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Engineering Design and Production
Experiences with CES in Teaching Mechanical Engineering Students at Aalto University
31 F. Inam
School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Electrical Engineering, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham (UK)
E‐learning for aerospace apprentices studying materials engineering: a teacher’s perspective
32 Z. Jaffer1, C. Baillie2, M. Flanagan3 and A. Stamboulis1
1University of Birmingham, School of Metallurgy and Materials
2University of Western Australia, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Maths
3University College London, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Threshold concepts in Fundamentals of Materials, a 1st year Materials Engineering module
33 M. Labaiz
Laboratory of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials, University BADJI Mokhtar, Algeria
Teaching of Materials Science in the University of Annaba, Algeria
34 E. Lamani, Sh. Caslli, D. Elezi
Polytechnic University of Tirana (PUT), Albania
Progress in active learning of Materials Science using CES resources
35 F. M. Morales, D. L. Sales, T. Ben, F. J. Pacheco, M. Herrera and R. García
Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz
CES‐based teaching experiences: online evaluation and group activities
36 G. Olivella
Granta Design
Granta Design's Teaching Resources in Spanish
37 E. Onyshchenko
JCAMD, London Metropolitan University
Designing out waste: to improve the sustainability of local trading
38 A. Pfennig
HTW University of Applied Sciences Berlin, Mechanical Engineering
Energy and Carbon Footprint of Outdoor Equipment
39 V. Rognoli, M. Levi
Facoltà del Design, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Material teaching in industrial design education: a course on expressive-sensorial characterization of materials.

40

C. Vila, G. M. Bruscas, L. Cabedo
Department of Industrial Systems Engineering and Design, Universitat JaumeI, Spain
Integrated selection of materials and processes within collaborative industrial design educational projects
41 V. Vitry, A. Aubert, F. Delaunois
University of Mons (UMONS), Belgium
Is there a future for teaching metallurgy in Belgium?
42 M. Wang, X. Jin and H. Lu
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Explore and Practice for Engineering Education Models in Materials
43 Z. Kolozsváry1, M. K. Baán2
1.SC Plasmaterm SA, Romania
2.University of Miskolc, Hungary
Added values of international collaboration in modernisation of Heat Treatment and Surface engineering education
44 M. Bassyouni1, S. Gutub2, Shereen M.-S. Abdel-Hamid3
1. Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh, Saudi Arabia
2. Department of Civil Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
3. Department of Chemical Engineering, Higher Technological Institute, Tenth of Ramadan, Egypt
Using CES EduPack in chemical and materials engineering

 

45 M. Nuria Salán
Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering Department, UPC - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (BarcelonaTECH)
The role play as a teaching innovation in materials

 

Abstracts for day one

Poster 1: Using CES EduPak to select Alternative Materials for The Greenpower Electric Car

M. Birkett

School of Computing, Engineering & Information Sciences, Northumbria University

When asked to consider materials for a particular application, students have a tendency to find out ‘what material is currently being used’ and assume that this is the only option or base their choices upon simplistic single factor indicators such as ‘the cheapest’ or ‘does not corrode’. As well restricting possible material solutions, this approach also prevents the student from asking the question ‘why was this material selected?’ The purpose of this assignment was to encourage students to consider the form, function and operating environment of components before using CES EduPack to help them select suitable materials.

Students were asked to select four key components of the Greenpower electric car and use sketches and illustrations to describe their form and identify key geometric features and critical dimensions. They were also required to comment on the function of the component, the operating environment and how they interact with other components and the driver of the car. The students then used this information to produce material property charts using CES EduPack to help them in the selection of alternative materials that could be used to manufacture two of their four chosen components.

The results showed that the use of CES EduPack encouraged the students to carefully consider the function and operating environment of the components and helped them make realistic material selections. On average, those students who used their own initiative to determine the material requirements achieved higher marks than those who researched the safer option of ‘what material is currently being used’. 

Poster 2: Estimation and modelling tools for advanced teaching and research

C.Bream, N.Ball, and C.Cesaretto
Granta Design

The world of materials is continually evolving with the number of new materials and models, which describe their performance, rising at an almost exponential rate. This presents a challenge, to both research and advanced teaching, of how to identify and communicate the benefits of these new materials and theories over existing solutions and, in the case of research, how to identify the most promising options before embarking on costly development projects. This issue can be addressed using the ‘Synthesizer’ tool, in CES Selector, which allows custom models to be added to the software, enabling the performance of new materials and structures to be predicted and compared against existing solutions on material property charts.

Some recent examples of this modelling capability include the development of ‘Synthesizer’ models to: predict the performance of balanced multi-layer materials, estimate part cost (combined material and processing costs) and, develop materials with controlled thermal expansion.

Poster 3: Open Educational Resources for the Materials and Engineering Teaching Communities (CORE-Materials and CORE-SET)

T. Bullough1,2, T. Novoselova1,2,  A. Mannis1,2, and A. Green3

1 Centre for Engineering Education, School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, UK


2 UK Centre for Materials Education
3 Materials e-learning Technologies Ltd

There is always a need for high quality electronic teaching resources to enhance the quality of teaching materials, and support students’ learning. We report on recent developments in the disciplines of Materials Science and Engineering in providing electronic resources for use in Higher Education (HE) as Open Education Resources (OERs, a well known example of which is MIT’s OpenCourseWare). These include the CORE-Materials repository of Materials OERs, and our more recent CORE-SET project to work with industry, charities and UK science discovery centres to facilitate the release of their wealth of resources as OERs for use in HE.

The “CORE-Materials” searchable repository of Materials OERs (core.materials.ac.uk), created by The UK Centre for Materials Education in conjunction with Materials academic and industrial collaborators, provides over 1650 Materials OERs in Materials Science and Engineering, all freely available under a range of Creative Commons licenses. So far almost 1000 micrographs, over 200 interactive simulations, 175 texts, and 160 videos and animations, and 55 presentations have been added. The “CORE-SET” project (http://coreset.liv.ac.uk/ ) is working with a consortium of partners outside of higher education; industry, public-sector and other organisations including Ceram, Exover, Kalzip, Sellafield, TWI, Engineers without Borders UK, the UK Association of Science and Discovery Centres, Techniquest, and Useful Simple Trust. The aim is to facilitate release of themed OER collections of these partners’ high-quality science, engineering and technology electronic resources which are useful to academics and students in Higher Education (HE). A particular focus is the creation of themed collections of resources linked to the global environment, energy and construction.

Examples of the Materials Science and Engineering OER teaching resources and collections will be shown, and the issues associated with this projects will be discussed, including the motivation underpinning the open release of teaching resources in general, and the processes and policies associated with the release of such resources. Advice will also be given to anyone interested in releasing their teaching resources openly as OERs.

Poster 4: Detailed design brief before pre dimensioning a technical system

J.P. Chevalier

C M Research and Technology, Ecole Centrale de Marseille, France

Pre-dimensioning a technical system of which you know practically nothing is almost an adventure when you are a student (a somewhat stressful adventure because course evaluation takes only pre-dimensioning into account).

Let us say that you don’t know the basics absolutely necessary to an engineer for designing some technical system: neither the materials, nor structure calculus, nor mechanics from motors to gears or ball bearings, and to get the picture complete, you are in the 2nd year curriculum of a graduate engineering school where you spent most of your 1st year deepening your knowledge of fundamental science.

It was a bit risky launching this practical activity after the recent 1st year curriculum reform.

(The three of us are experienced engineers and we just need to feel better motivation at learning from successive classes of students). This is not big news but we used an iterative learning path concluded by a whole day where students in groups of five, worked independently on a technical system. Obviously, due to a rapid, recent launch we had no equipment backing up the activity. Student groups came with their computers for the last working day and they were given links to some resources accessible by wifi connexion. Most of the necessary data were produced when discussing four previous case studies (the last 2 centred on the subject of their autonomous work: photovoltaic trackers at that time).

It worked so well that the next set of students are now more numerous choosing our activity in the 2nd year curriculum optional part. (Our presentation analyses the main reasons for the success of this recipe).

So now, we are wondering if we should have a general data base accessible for this activity and others. We also think this activity could be generalized through some kind of E-learning but we still need to optimize our teaching process.

Poster 5: REMATERIALISE: the value of a physical sustainable materials library embedded within education

J. Dehn

Kingston University, School of Design, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture

The REMATERIALISE sustainable materials research initiated in1994, grew out of a love of materials and a concern about the potential for designers to create significant amounts of waste. In 2003 this library grew naturally alongside three years of AHRC funded research into the sustainable development of materials and the design process.

Research methods included: -

  • 45 face to face interviews with designers, educators, manufacturers, retail outlets and local, national and international governments involved in the development and use of materials made from waste within Europe, USA and Asia.
  • Visits to international, material trade shows.
  • Materials workshops.

Case studies derived from these interviews formed the basis of the travelling exhibition, ‘Creative Resource’ about the value that we place upon materials. They described the economic potential of interdisciplinary collaborations, showing the transformation of materials from rubbish to desirable.

Research showed that: -

  • Government legislation had been a strong incentive for businesses to explore material use.
  • Combining design with the use of non-renewable resources made business sense.
  • Physical engagement with materials involving; industry, educators, design students and autistic school children enabled real enquiry, collaboration and innovation.

The library houses over 1,200 samples from 22 countries and receives visitors including; designers, architects, manufacturers, retail outlets, librarians and researchers from all over the world. It has become part of the design ethos at the University leading to sustainable materials consultancy with industry. This has given students educational opportunities and generated manufacturing business enabling the Rematerialise library to close the loop between environment, industry and education. This paper describes these collaborations and the educational benefits of a sustainable materials library embedded within education.  The tactile and aesthetic qualities of these materials seem to give groups and communities a common focus.

Poster 6: Product re-engineering for enhanced end-of-life performance:
A residential school activity for undergraduate engineering students

M.H. Endean, K. Clay, S.J. Burnley, and A. Goodyear

Dept. of Design, Development, Environment and Materials, Faculty of Maths, Computing & Technology, The Open University

Students of The Open University who enrol on the residential school module Engineering in Action undertake a team project focused on end-of-life product design. This subject is of key importance in the context of the engineer’s role in sustainability. The team aspect also provides an important opportunity for skills development for students who normally work alone and at a distance.

Students are provided with preparatory material, which they study before attending the residential week, and notes and instructions at residential school that cover what they are expected to achieve. There is additional supporting material provided through a module website, including full access to The Open University online library.

The team project is divided into three sessions spanning a week long programme of other laboratory based activities. Session 1 acts as a team forming and icebreaker activity centred on dismantling and investigating an item of waste electrical or electronic equipment (WEEE) such as a radio, kettle, or telephone. Session 2 is aimed at gathering information on design for manufacture/assembly and design for end-of-life, the waste recovery and recycling industry, and the legislative framework for WEEE. Session 3 culminates in a short poster presentation by the student teams detailing proposals for design improvements to improve end-of-life performance of the product.

The activity is facilitated by part-time tutors who are contracted for the residential week alone, working to guidance provided by the Engineering in Action module team.

The effectiveness of the activity was evaluated in 2010 with support from the UK Centre for Materials Education small grant funding scheme. Students were invited to complete evaluation questionnaires and volunteer for a follow-up telephone interview. Tutor feedback was also obtained. The evaluation was overwhelmingly supportive of the design and delivery of the new team project. Improvements continue to be implemented following each module presentation.

Poster 7: Introducing materials and sustainability in pre-university curricula with CES EduPack

X. Frontere and R. Doue

Granta Design

Sustainability is now a major challenge for our society which faces the issue of preserving natural resources. This subject is more and more taught is numerous universities all around the world, but how is it possible to implant this notion to the youngest students?

This poster presents the example of French Education System and its reform which aimed at modernising teaching in secondary and high schools in order to adapt it to this new issue. Thanks to this reform, students get a better scientific culture and are introduced earlier to sustainability. This aims to revitalize this area of study and provide the labour market with engineers and technicians, who are already aware of sustainability challenges.

To support this reform, Granta Design adapted the CES EduPack in collaboration with teachers and French educational authorities (“Académies”). New teaching resources like courses, design projects and exercises have been created and translated to support teaching in the fields of Materials, Processes and Eco-Design.

One year after the implementation of the reform, more than 50% of targeted high schools have integrated CES EduPack as a cross-disciplinary tool for teaching. New developments are also in progress to adapt CES EduPack to teaching in secondary schools.

Poster 8: From Design to Science: An Educational Resource on ‘NEU’ Materials to Inspire and Motivate Students

M. Fry, T. Götte

Granta Design

Background: The New, Emerging and Unusual (NEU) Materials Database is a joint project of Granta Design, University of Cambridge and Technische Universität Berlin. It is developed to provide academics with quick access to information on NEU materials for teaching.

Concept: The database is developed for CES EduPack, an educational resource used at over 800 universities and colleges worldwide in the fields of engineering, science and design to support materials and process related teaching. Most CES EduPack Editions, like many other teaching resources, focus on established materials. The integration of materials such as Aerogels, Shape Memory Alloys and Nano-materials aims to provide educators with a supporting resource to attract their students’ interest in materials.

Embodiment: Each material record contains a description, the composition and an image of the material; —if possible, a typical application is also given. General and physical properties in the datasheet give the material a profile that can be compared to other established engineering materials using the CES EduPack selection capabilities. The incorporation of two additional attributes, Material design and Microstructure, provides information on how process technology, chemical composition and the resultant microstructure affect the material’s properties (i.e., microstructure-property relations).

Value: A computer based system enables the user to quickly access information on NEU materials and compare it to information on established engineering materials. Students can browse, search and select, and can explore unique properties, with the help of material property charts, in an interactive way.

Results and Discussion: The database was first released in January 2011. So far more than 160 academics have downloaded the database for evaluation. The level of depth as well as the breadth of the database will be reviewed based on feedback during the next development cycle, currently scheduled for July - December 2012. Some universities have already agreed to contribute to the database in the field of Nano-materials. The benefit to such contributing institutions and their partners will be raised awareness of their developments amongst a wider academic audience through full acknowledgement in the database.

Poster 9: Residential school modules and their role in distance learning for undergraduate engineering

A. Goodyear and M.H. Endean

Dept. of Design, Development, Environment and Materials, Faculty of Maths, Computing & Technology, The Open University

The Design and Engineering Programme of The Open University offers two undergraduate residential school modules in engineering as part of its BEng (Hons) programme of study. These modules contribute to the practical and team working skills development for students as part of a predominantly distance learning qualification.

The modules are Engineering: An active introduction at level 1 and Engineering in Action at level 2 which are designed to provide laboratory, field and creative work activities as carried out by engineers. The modules complement other distance learning modules in engineering at each respective level.

Each module consists of three distinct components over a six month period that build towards completion of the learning outcomes. Students are provided with preparatory material that is studied at an early stage and engagement with the module is ensured by use of either print or online resources coupled with interactive online assessment of the study material.

Students then complete a one week long residential school utilising the laboratory and classroom facilities of a host university with the majority of experimental equipment being designed and supplied by The Open University. Each intensive module week hosts approximately 90 students and is repeated for successive student cohorts. The week is focused on four day-long laboratory sessions and a team project consisting of three sessions that span the week. The daytime programme is supplemented by a tutorial, lecture, and workshop evening programme. Activities are facilitated by part-time teaching staff and module team members.

Following the residential school week students complete an end-of-module assessment (EMA) that is submitted approximately six weeks later. The assessment tests module learning outcomes that include data manipulation, critical analysis, modelling, experiment design, and report writing skills. Feedback is given on the level of learning outcomes achievement together with the module score.

Poster 10: Consideration of Viscoelastic Properties of Polymers for Materials Selection

P. Guttmann, G. Pilz, and F. Röper

Department Polymer Engineering and Science, Chair of Materials Science and Testing of Plastics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, A

Finding the right materials for technical applications requires a systematic approach to the materials selection process based on comparable materials data. This includes the translation of design requirements into a material specification and finally screening and ranking potentially suitable materials. For an application relevant materials selection the viscoelastic, time-dependent mechanical behaviour of polymers for high demand requirements has to be considered. In the most cases the needed information about creep behaviour is poorly available. Therefore the experimental determination of application relevant creep data is an important element in the materials selection process for high demand applications.

The present poster shows an efficient method for the determination of long term creep properties by the use of the time-temperature superposition principle. By performing short-term creep tests at elevated test temperatures, long term creep data can be determined for application relevant conditions.

Poster 11: Granta Design's Teaching Resources Website

M. Hsieh and H. Melia

Granta Design

The new Teaching Resource Website contains over 225 resources contributed by academics in the Materials Education Community. The resources are intended primarily for materials related courses at the undergraduate level across Science, Engineering and Design disciplines. Most are password protected and only available to educators using CES EduPack, however a growing number are also now open access. The site includes:

  • Exercises with Worked Solutions (350+)
  • PowerPoint Lectures (70+)
  • Videos and Webinar Recordings
  • Databases and Project Files
  • Teach-yourself manuals
  • White Papers

Granta plans to continue adding more resources and we are very interested to hear about good resources that we should be linking to, good resource websites we should be collaborating with and any other ideas

Poster 12: Classroom experiments in the new degree of Materials Science and Engineering at UPM

K. Konstantopoulou, T. Palacios, E. Tejado, A. Ridruejo, and J. Y. Pastor

Department of Materials Science, Technical University of Madrid

The present study proposes a new educational method that fits perfectly into the new educational strategies arising from the European Space for Higher Education. Specifically, with this method the students have to design an experiment and carry it out in order to present a report of the obtained results and finally realize in the class an oral presentation. The idea of the experiment is related to the subject of Structure of Materials II and for the better realization of the study the students have formed small groups of three or four people. So, the motivation of this study is a challenge in order to make the education more interesting and more attractive for the students as well for the teachers.

In addition, these activities form a part of the evaluation of the students. For this reason, it is necessary the supervision of each work and a number of preliminary steps like writing a proposal of ideas, presentation of a brief report and oral presentation before the final evaluation. In this way, it can be achieved a control of the way that the students are working and also prevent potentially dangerous or inappropriate experiments. Thus, each group has a particular supervisor in order to ask for help or for any doubt that could occur.

Finally, on the long term, the findings showed that, comparing with previous courses, innovative teaching procedures performed resulted in higher grades and an increase of the motivation among students for the subject and, broadly, for the degree. Moreover this activity not only stimulates student´s creativity and autonomous learning but also enhances crucial transversal skills such as team work, communication skills and the promotion of a deep comprehension of scientific methodology in an appealing and more attractive way.

Poster 13: Inter-university network for Innovation in Materials Science Teaching

J. Orozco1, T. Guraya2, J. Ibarretxe2, L. Cabedo3, J. Gómez3, R. Izquierdo3, D. Sales4, D.  González4,
P. Lopez-Crespo5, M. Segarra6, N. Salan7, and G. Olivella8

1 Universitat Politècnica de València
2 Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea


3 Universidad Jaime I
4 Universidad de Cádiz
5 Universidad de Málaga
6 Universitat de Barcelona
7 Universidad Politècnica de Catalunya
8 Granta Design Ltd

[email protected] is a recently founded inter-university network. Currently, it is composed of Mmaterials Sscience teachers from seven universities in Spain, and it is open to all other universities in the country. The origin of the project is located in the 3th Iinternational Mmaterials Eeducation Ssymposium, where several Spanish teachers identified an opportunity for synergic collaboration, that would lead to a more homogeneous and improved teaching experience The collaboration within the network is aimed at sharing teaching resources like course programs, exercises, guidelines for practical lessons, CES EduPack projects, moodle activities, online resources, etc. Other multimedia resources and experiences meant to improve teaching quality are also shared. A 2.0 website to support all shared materials is being developed. Network coordinator is rotated every year and periodical meetings are also scheduled.

Poster 14: Material Science through activity based learning

R. Rajendran

School of Mechanical and Building Sciences, B S Abdur Rahman University, India

Generally the students find the materials science as a dry and boring subject mainly because there's a lot to learn and little time, leading to no time for practicals and field trips. Building in clear ideas about the application of a particular scientific principle through activity with fun, can help to make the subject more interesting.

One of the efficient ways of lecture is to instruct and demonstrate or make them observe and learn. In this activity based learning, a demonstration of the concept is given which the students observe and learn giving scope for self learning, followed by the instruction. Students design a fair test for comparing the bounciness of balls made from different materials (e.g. tennis ball, rubber ball, cork ball, plastic ball) were provided for the test. From this they learn about the elasticity of the materials that the object is made from. The Griffith theory has been explained through blowing a balloon and piercing it with pin, indicating the thermodynamic energy balance of crack propagation for a fast fracture.

Apart from the technical knowledge gained, the concept of teamwork is also introduced. In order to quickly promote team bonding, each team has been assigned a topic to be presented in class. To conclude we can say this activity provides a linkage between theory and practice creating a physical connection to the real world examples. The benefits of the activity learning are easy understanding of the subject in an interesting way with increased involvement as the students have hands on experience. From a pedagogical standpoint, this activity was successful as it provides an opportunity for self learning, effective communication and team dynamics among the students. This approach would be welcomed by professors who emphasise on the practical applications of the materials science that they teach.

Poster 15: Online Materials Teaching and Learning Resources: DoITPoMS

N.A. Rutter, Z.H. Barber, and T.W. Clyne

Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK

DoITPoMS (www.doitpoms.ac.uk) offers a wide range of online Teaching and Learning Resources for Materials Science. The resources are generally interactive and seek to make maximum use of the online medium to provide richer content than would be possible in traditional printed resources.

Stand-alone Teaching & Learning Packages (TLPs) introduce concepts from a basic level, suitable for any scientist, and build on these to provide advanced level coverage of many materials-based topics. These TLPs, of which there are currently over 60, exploit interactivity through animations and simulations, video clips, questions (& model answers), and links to other resources. All elements of these packages can be separately downloaded, and used in creating customised educational resources. A Micrograph Library, containing about 1,000 images, each with associated metadata, provides further support for taught courses and those interested in material microstructures. A library of materials science related videos is also available and, as with other DoITPoMS content, contributions are invited from those with appropriate material.

All DoITPoMS resources are covered by non-commercial Creative Commons licences, meaning they can be included freely, in any teaching material. DoITPoMS has worked closely with CORE-Materials (Collaborative Open Resource Environment for Materials) to increase accessibility of its resources.  This has taken the form of uploading many videos from the DoITPoMS video library to YouTube and the addition of hundreds of micrographs to Flickr.

DoITPoMS has become a familiar and recognisable brand, and is now very widely used around the world. From a number of sources, including Google Analytics, we have amassed a significant amount of data regarding the usage of these resources. This poster will illustrate the resources available and investigate trends and patterns in their use.

Poster 16: Life-Long Learning Programme for Engineers in Engineering Pedagogy

T. Rüütmann, H. Kipper

Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia

Development of the life-long learning programme for continuing education of engineers in the field of teaching engineering has been of essential importance at Tallinn University of Technology. The designed programme has been completed in 2011. The first students were admitted to the pilot study programme in September 2011.

A three-staged methodology has been used in the programme design starting with decisions on overall goals, learning objectives and intended learning outcomes. The design followed the six-step model: (1) Establish Qualification Profile, (2) Establish Admission Quality, (3) Define Course Content, (4) Establish the Programme at Macro Level, (5) Establish the Programme at Micro Level, and (6) Integrate the Programme within the University System.

As the required entrance qualification of candidates is Master degree in engineering, it is assumed that they have already acquired a complete knowledge and practical skills in the relevant field of engineering on high level afore. Engineers will acquire additionally knowledge and skills in teaching engineering subjects, both in theory and practice.

The programme is based on the Frame Curriculum of International Society for Engineering Education (IGIP) the basic concept of which calls for a life-long continuous improvement process to excellent teaching and learning. The curriculum of IGIP represents a triad of knowledge, teaching methodology and of value ethical attitudes.

Engineering teachers will acquire effective strategies and models which have been worked out for teaching thinking skills and capitalizing deep understanding in teaching engineering. Contemporary teaching methods, emphasizing conceptual understanding, adapted specially for engineering education have been switched into the programme.

This poster presentation describes the design, the structure, objectives and corresponding effective teaching strategies emphasising conceptual understanding, being adapted specially for engineering education.

Poster 17: Teaching design in the first years of a traditional mechanical engineering degree: methods, issues and future perspectives

A. Silva1,2, M. Fontul1

1 Dept. Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon,Portugal
2 Granta Design Limited

Engineering design is known as an answer to an ill-defined problem. As any answer to an ill-defined problem, it can never be completely right or absolutely wrong. The methods that Universities use to teach engineering design, as a consequence of this, suffer from the same fate. However, the accumulated experience with the “chalk and talk” teaching tradition has lead to a reality in which the employers of fresh graduates are not happy with the engineers they are getting. Part of their complaints are related with the inability of recently graduated Engineers to work in problems where the boundaries are not well defined, are interdisciplinary, require the use of effective communication and deal with non-technical issues. These skills are mostly absent from traditional engineering curricula. Possible solutions for this would be either to build completely new curricula, or to accommodate some change in the present curricula, to enhance these much needed skills. The authors chose to pursue the latter approach.

The work presented demonstrates the implementation of engineering design perspectives enhancing some of the aforementioned skills in a traditional mechanical engineering curriculum. In particular, these changes were implemented in the first and second year, where they were perceived as being harder to implement. The results clearly show that there is no need for A-Z knowledge of calculus, or an extremely elaborate skill in structural analysis to design simple products. That is not to say that the products designed by freshmen are without flaws and cannot be improved. It merely externalizes our innate fear to let students try different things in their learning process and at the same time foster their awareness to other externalities (in this context, meaning concern with other things than simply engineering analysis). What they gain with this experience is a different perspective of what engineering design should or can be, and ways of looking at engineering problems with a different mindset, possibly arriving to solutions that are better for the end user.

This different perspective in the first and second year of an engineering curriculum has consequences further downstream, as these students will have difficulties conforming again to a traditional mindset. The students, together with the faculty will then be equally instrumental in changing the entire engineering curriculum from within.

Poster 18: Sharing experiences with Engineering Materials Projects

R. Wallach1, A. Pereira2, A. Silva2

1 Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK 2 Granta Design

Abstract to follow...

Poster 19: GRANTA MI—A Framework for Capturing and Re-Using Research Data

S. Warde, D. Cebon, J. Goddin

Granta Design

Research groups in materials and related subjects amass more and more information each year – e.g., raw test data, meta-data providing context for these tests, analysis results, research notes, images and, increasingly, video.  As data piles up and PhD and post-doctoral researchers come and go, it can be hard to make the most of this resource.  Useful data is lost, buried in filing cabinets, hidden away on PC hard drives, or scattered around the department network.  Much of this data is never re-used.  Information that could be of value to collaborators or industrial sponsors is not made available to them in a format or location that makes it usable.

Industry has faced similar problems. For example, the Material Data Management Consortium (MDMC) is a collaboration of aerospace, defense, and energy enterprises that has worked with Granta Design to develop an industry-standard system for managing, controlling, sharing, and using its valuable materials data.  These companies want to protect their investments in materials science.  The result of this work is GRANTA MI – software that allows a research group, department, or company to capture all of its materials data in a single, central database, to manage that data, and to make it available to authorized group members and collaborators through a web browser interface that makes the data simple to search, browse, and apply.

GRANTA MI can now be applied in academic research to make best use of the investments of time, effort, and research funding that university departments and their sponsors make in materials research.  This poster will show how GRANTA MI can be applied in academia, taking examples from the Transport Research Group at the Cambridge University Engineering Department, and from several European Union collaborative projects in which Granta is currently engaged with a range of academic and industrial partners. The poster will also comment on the educational benefits of such an approach–preparing research students for some key practical considerations and systems that they will encounter should they move into industry and want to maximize the impact of their work.

Poster 20: The use (and abuse) of CES EduPack in distant design education

T. Zamenopoulos

Faculty of Maths, Computing and Technology, The Open University

Design and material technology teaching in Universities has been traditionally carried out within design workshops (or design studios). In these workshops, students learn about material properties and material selection processes through the direct supervision and guidance of tutors. In the context of distance design education, such knowledge is developed through reading materials and online tutorials. In this context, tools such as the CES EduPack database may offer additional benefits by helping students to follow a more systematic way to explore and select materials. However, despite all the advantages there are many challenges.

This poster aims to highlight some issues and opportunities that arise with the use of CES EduPack in the context of distant design education, based on the experience of chairing the second level course in design that is offered by the Open University. The course entitled ‘Design and Designing’ has approximately 450 students per year and aims to help students to develop design skills that are applicable in a variety of design domains (product design, engineering design but also architectural design). A part of this aim is the development of some basic material selection skills. CES EduPack is provided to students together with readings about material properties and guided examples of the material selection process. Due to the nature of the course, it is very difficult to have a direct observation of how students use the database. However, by looking at students’ selected materials and their argumentation in submitted assignments it is possible to identify cases where students follow an appropriate material selection strategy but reach an inappropriate conclusion.  This is often the result of limited understanding of certain material properties. The poster will discuss these issues together with some ideas of how CES EduPack can be used in the future in order to deal with these difficulties.

Poster 21: A first assessment of distant learning in the field of materials science

O. Zanellato, P. Lefrancois, Z. Hadjem-Hamouche, A. Ikhlef, J. Bechet, J-P. Chevalier

Département Matériaux industriels, CNAM, Paris

Today, the stakes of reindustrialisation are not only in the hands of large companies but also at the level of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). It is thus crucial to provide a teaching service that is flexible and easily accessible in space and time.

According to our institution’s motto ‘Omnes docet ubique’ (teaching to all and everywhere), the department of industrial materials at CNAM aims at teaching materials science throughout France with strong links with industry. So far a network of teaching centres has been established throughout the country but this is not sufficient to cover the fine grid of SMEs. A solution has been developed for a few years in terms of distant learning as an alternative to live teaching.

Traditionally, two forms of ‘live’ teaching are performed at CNAM: graduating courses for individuals and short courses for employees sponsored by their company. The department has been working on developing some of these courses for distant learning.

The experience so far shows that most companies tend to be cautious about registering their employees on a distant learning short course rather than sending them to a traditional course. However, the practice yields better results provided the company offers to the employees the appropriate resources to follow the course (dedicated time and space, involvement of a local tutor…). This success is attributed to the larger personal involvement of the student in the learning process.

Graduating courses mainly aim at turning experienced technicians into qualified engineers. At the moment, distance learning for these courses is not as successful as for short courses and there is a high rate of motivation loss amongst the students. A proposed solution is to make the process less impersonal by reinforcing the role of the tutor and the peers.

Abstracts for Day Two

Poster 22: Deciding on Low-Carbon Power Systems: Materials and Energy Criteria

M. Ashby and A. Silva

Granta Design

If you want to make and use materials the first prerequisite is energy. The global consumption of primary energy today is approaching 500 exajoules (EJ)1, derived principally from the burning of gas, oil and coal. This reliance on fossil fuels will have to diminish in coming years to meet three emerging pressures:

  • to adjust to diminishing reserves of oil and gas
  • to reduce the flow of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere
  • to reduce dependence on foreign imports of energy and the tensions these create

The world-wide energy demand is expected to treble by 2050. The bulk of this energy will be electrical. Renewable power systems draw their energy from natural sources: the sun (through solar, wind, and wave), the moon (through tidal power), and the Earth’s interior (through geothermal heat). But it is a mistake to think that they are in any sense “free”. They incur a capital cost, which can be large. They require land. Materials and energy are consumed to construct and maintain them, and both construction and maintenance have an associated carbon footprint. How can these alternative power systems be compared? We do so by examining their resource intensities. The latest CES EduPack system includes a database of low-carbon power systems and the materials of which they are made. It is a specially adapted version of the CES EduPack Level 3 database, expanded to have a new data-table, that for “Low-carbon energy systems”. The additional data-table, with which the software opens, contains records for the power systems incorporated in the tool:

  • Conventional fossil-fuel power: gas and coal
  • Nuclear power
  • Solar energy: thermal, thermo-electric and photo-voltaics
  • Wind power
  • Hydro power
  • Wave power
  • Tidal power
  • Geothermal power
  • Biomass

The database can be inquired for a number of parameters pertaining to each of the above power systems, like Capital intensity ($/kW), Area intensity (m2/kW), Material intensity (kg/kW), Construction energy intensity (MJ/kW), Construction Carbon intensity (kg/kW) and Capacity factor(%).

Poster 23: CES EduPack: a tool for entrepreneurship Education

T. Ben1, D. L. Sales1, L. López2, P. Perdomo2, F. M. Morales1, N. Baladés1, D. González1 and R. García1

1 Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I.,
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz


2 Departamento de Organización de Empresas,
Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Cádiz

Nowadays the huge competition between product manufacturing companies demands the continuous implantation of innovative designs, from both economic and technological point of view, to increase their market. It is well known that these new ideas strongly contribute to the development of the countries. Unexpectedly, successful business ideas are mainly conceived from small companies and even nonexpert people. This suggests a lack in innovation and entrepreneurship education within higher education systems. Teaching engineering students basic and advanced technological and economic aspects related to materials design and manufacture is a key-factor for promoting the innovative and entrepreneurial spirit of new engineers joining the workforce.

Some teachers bellowing to two different Educational Areas, Material Science and Engineering and Business Management in the University of Cádiz have adapted some methodology activities purposed at the High Education European Frame (EEES) to foster the development of the specific and transversal competences established for determine degree. In particular, by combining the CES-EduPack tool and complementary information, several learning activities based on the case study have been designed for the student´s self-assessment on material and process engineering evaluating technological and economic respect. The skills acquired have qualified students to carry out an economic-technical basic project on using new materials for specific applications or optimizing the manufacturing of any materials or equipment.

The formative assessment and the self-assessment by using the CES-EduPack tool have demonstrated to be the base for promoting the innovation and the entrepreneurship at the professional frame. In this sense, final degree projects are presented proposing new materials for eco-design of shipping and Liquefied Petroleum Gas van containers.

Poster 24: International Master Programs at National University of Science and Technology “MISiS”

B.Bokshteyn, A.Rodin, and O.Ushakova

National University of Science and Technology, MISiS, Russia

MISiS remains one of Russia’s leading research and educational centers.  It provides a first-class professional education for over 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students. MISiS offers extensive opportunities for education and specialized scientific research in Materials Science, Metallurgy and New Materials, Ecology, Economics, Industrial Management and other fields. The new master programs for English–speaking students were developed and ready for realization:

  • Quantum Physics for Advanced Materials Engineering
  • Multicomponent nanostructured coatings. Nanofilms
  • Advanced Materials Science
  • Advanced Metallic Materials and Engineering.

These programs are focused on either scientific or engineering education.  To apply for a two-year Master programs at MISiS the applicant must hold a Bachelor’s degree in Materials Science, Solid State Physics, Materials Science, Nanomaterials or Metallurgy. Given that all classes will be conducted in English, we recommend that nonnative speakers of English achieve a TOEFL score of at 525 (paper based) or 213 (computer based) prior to admission. Students who wish to improve their English language skills will have the opportunity to take English classes either in an intensive language program a month before the official start of the Master courses  or during the whole period of study in regular English Language classes. Those students who not intending to study at MISiS for the entire two year degree period may select courses on an individual basis. They will receive an Educational Certificate, indicating the type of course taken and the credit hours earned.

Poster 25: Master's Program "Advanced Materials Science"

B.Bokshteyn, A.Rodin, and O.Ushakova

National University of Science and Technology, MISiS, Russia

Program objectives. The Master's program "Advanced Materials Science" is focused on the study of new construction materials used in space engineering, accurate mechanical engineering, medicine, information technologies and other fields. The program is designed for students who have received a BS degree in solid state physics or chemistry, materials science, nanomaterials or metallurgy.

Skills & Competences. The program helps students find appropriate solutions for contemporary scientific problems in materials science as well as understand the principles of materials design for different purposes, theoretical and experimental methods and methods of computer modeling. The program helps students choose the optimal conditions of materials production and evaluate preliminary costs of experiments and ways to reduce them. It teaches students to become more effective and efficient in teamwork and apply the practical results of their studies in real-life setting.

Basic courses: 1. Atomic structure of solid phases; 2. Thermodynamics and kinetics in materials science; 3. Diffusion in solids; 4. Physical properties of materials; 5. Corrosion and protection of metals; 6. Magnetic materials; 7. Materials science: deformation and fracture, mechanical properties, special metallic alloys; 8. Methods of surfaces and interfaces investigation; 9. Numerical methods and computer modeling; 10. Multicomponent nanostructured coatings; 11. Amorphous metallic alloys; 12. Mechanical spectroscopy of metallic materials.

Usually, most theoretical classes are held within the 1st and 2nd terms of the program, yet certain classes may also take place during the 3rd term. Students will carry out research and experimental work either at the MISiS laboratories or at the Institutes of the Russian Academy of Science. Most research work is conducted during the 3rd term of the program. Students prepare a Research Report which will be partially included in their dissertation. During the 4th terms students are mainly engaged in working on their dissertations.

Poster 26: Resources to Support Bio-engineering and Biological Materials Education

L. Brown and A. Pereira

Granta Design

Granta Design is developing resources to support the teaching of bio-engineering and biological materials. This poster will look at current progress related to introductory and advanced topics, including the introductory and intermediate CES EduPack Bio-engineering Databases, and the advanced Human Biological Materials Database.

The Human Biological Materials Database is a unique resource of mechanical property data for specific human tissues that is compiled from published literature concerning the properties of the tissues of the human body. The database contains properties of the skeletal tissues, which have been collected and analysed for the main different types of material found in each individual bone, such as cortical and trabecular bone of the femur. Where possible, dependencies such as age are presented in graphical form, enabling the user to visually see how the properties are affected.

The data compilation is suitable for FEA applications, to compare the properties of these materials with synthetic materials, for educational purposes and as a general reference source. In particular the information presented will provide a thorough introduction to the mechanical properties of human tissues for educational courses. However, it is ideally suited for in-depth research of the biomechanical properties of tissues, due to the ease that the data can be extracted from the database for simulation analysis and for comparison to synthetic materials for potential prostheses.

Poster 27: The Questions Posed by Materials for Design Anthropology Education

A. Drazin

Department of Anthropology, University College London

Anthropology is playing an increasing role in materials engineering, conducting parallel work on contexts of use and design;  but a focus on materials  poses questions.  The putative materials revolution heralds, if not the death of certain material culture approaches, then radical revisions in thinking.  Traditional anthropological approaches to social life are, for good methodological reasons, past-focussed and respectful of the contemporary material conditions of informants. 

A materials paradigm poses problems by revealing how, in some instances, ethnographic research destroys its subject.  Making explicit the material world can undermine its taken-for-grantedness.  Ethnographic work and understandings aim to change the researcher to fit the context, more than the other way around, but a focus on materials means the social mutability of our field sites. 

This means that education in the anthropology of materials and design is not only about addressing a skills gap, helping anthropologists find ways of working with objects and materials.  It also presents epistemological challenges.  To evoke the notion of materials is to present a question for social scientists more than an explanatory category. 

It was decided at UCL Anthropology that a new MA was the initial way to engage with these issues.  We explore the ways social science work can inform materials design & engineering, but more importantly what working with materials can do for anthropological understandings of culture.  We deploy participation as an educational and heuristic tool, emulating a triangular way of working: the anthropologist positioned between a ‘field site’ on the one hand (a community, context, set of informants), and an ‘audience’ or ‘client’ (designers, engineers) on the other. 

The poster will outline examples of work being produced, and some of the implications for ways of working, ways of knowing, and ways of producing anthropologists. 

Poster 28:The four quadrant method in teaching

U. Fekken

Hanzehogeschool Groningen

As  has been discussed in most textbooks by Prof. Ashby, a random comparison of non-self-similar shapes in structural sections is not possible in a single graph. The reason is that the second moment of area must be considered invariant while the free variables size and material properties are being compared to yield the best solution.

In practical assignments, it turns out that self-similar shapes do occur regularly in similar materials, but as soon as a range of possible material solutions is to be compared, similarity is usually not available.  Structural sections of various materials differ much in shape, mostly due to the different production processes.

In earlier textbooks, the so called Four Quadrant method was introduced to account for the varying second moment of area. Unfortunately, in later textbook editions this solution seemingly has disappeared. For the method, structural sections including Shape factor values are needed.

Structural sections appear in Level 3 CES, though in quite limited numbers, mostly related to commercially available products. Custom made profiles, being sawn, bent or welded  can be a serious alternative.

In Hanzehogeschool education program the four quadrant method is embedded, together with the introduction of custom made shapes into the CES database, using the Constructor.

The poster shows students work. The method appears to be easily adapted by bachelor students.

Poster 29: Delivering Engineers for a Sustainable World. How to change towards sustainable universities?

D. Ferrer-Balas

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain

Background and motivation: This work is fruit of the work of 10 years working in the field of sustainability in higher education, trying to embed sustainability across all activities of technical universities, and therefore in engineering education. A lesson learned is that it is necessary to look at this problem in a systems perspective, as sustainability needs a profound transformation of knowledge, but also of attitudes, values, structures, etc.

Introduction: Some universities, among them also some technological universities, are beginning the path toward "sustainable university". The aim of this work is to analyse conceptually the dimensions of the needed changes in these organizations to make this transition successfully.

Conceptual framework: The approach taken is that of sustainable transitions, which are systemic changes aimed at sustainability. The transition model adopted is based on Jansen (and previous adaptations of the author) with three basic dimensions for the change: the framework (F), the level (L) and the actors (A).

Given the research and education role of universities, this work starts reviewing the literature about new scientific paradigms posed by sustainability as an implicit or explicit goal. From these paradigms, the dimensions of the changes that are happening or should be produced in universities are identified, with some examples.

Results and conclusions: We propose a new conceptual model for managing the transition to sustainable technological university. The model suggests a strategical approach that aims that our organizations and their members can enhance the learning cycle and thus acquire better skills for the practice of social responsibility and sustainability. It is based in transdisciplinary research, innovation and education projects which involve a diversity of actors under a strategic corporate sustainability program to become effective.

Poster 30: Experiences with CES in Teaching Mechanical Engineering Students at Aalto University

R. Ilola, T. Kiesi, and H. Hänninen

Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Engineering Design and Production

Mechanical engineers and designers, besides material scientists, need to have sufficient knowledge of engineering materials and their properties in order to select materials appropriately. Mainly, teaching of material science to mechanical engineering students at Aalto University has followed the guidelines of the traditional materials science textbooks.

In addition, during the last decade the CES Selector software together with the book "Materials Selection in Mechanical Design", has been used in teaching materials selection methods for the 4th year students. The course has included introductory lectures based on the course book and an exercise work on a real-life industrial materials selection case done with the CES software. The course has been one of the advanced courses at the Aalto University Department of Engineering Design and Production and its purpose has been to bring together students with a different studying background to solve materials selection problems from different aspects.

Based on the students' feedback, a large single exercise done with the CES Selector software has been replaced with smaller-scale hands-on exercises done with students own personal copy of CES EduPack software. The poster presents experiences on the teacher's point of view of this change and also the students' feedback on these new course arrangements.

Poster 31: E‐learning for aerospace apprentices studying materials engineering:
a teacher’s perspective

F. Inam

School of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Electrical Engineering, Glyndŵr University, Wrexham (UK)

E-learning represents manifestation of the imperative for materials education to respond to the consumer (employer and students) orientation that impels so much of our society today. The real strength of internet, a global tool, cannot be exploited when it comes to online learning (including collaboration) for industrial apprentices employed full-time. A personal reflection in the light of a comprehensive statistical analysis is presented. Fifty six (56) higher education engineering students, working for a local aerospace industry (Airbus), were surveyed who recently studied materials science and engineering using carefully moderated part-online modules. Pedagogies and various practices of delivering synchronous and asynchronous online activities are presented. Appropriate feedback (timely constructive criticism) and e-moderated edutainment (learning by multi-media) were identified as the most efficient aspects of successful online materials biased programmes. Further enhancement in the interactive content is suggested for enhancing the learning process. Students’ learning needs can further be accommodated in elearning context by empowering learners, maximising the use of social media and online-forums, developing range of digital literacies (e.g. virtual tensile testing laboratory for HE students, (www.mse.4mg.com), treating learners as managers of their own learning, supporting use of learners own technology (smart phone apps) and being inclusive and very clear on expectations - how learners manage in a digitally complex environment. Tools for conducting interactive and development provoking assessments (summative and formative) are summarised. Challenges (institutional and general barriers) for successful implementation of open and distance learning are presented. Some of the major ones are: a) lack of funding for novel/ experimental technology; b) compromising individual learner needs; c) lack of consumer demand and appreciation among wider participation; d) online learning not replacing development of personal interactive and augmentative skills; and e) lack of awareness of e-platforms and tools among academia.

Poster 32: Threshold concepts in Fundamentals of Materials, a 1st year Materials Engineering module

Z. Jaffer1, C. Baillie2, M. Flanagan3, and A. Stamboulis1

1 University of Birmingham, School of Metallurgy and Materials


2 University of Western Australia, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Maths
3 University College London, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

A threshold concept is a concept central to the mastery of a specific subject area, developed by Meyer and Land. The threshold concepts have certain characteristics including being transformative, irreversible, integrative, bounded, discursive, reconstitutive and can be troublesome. In this project, we identified potential threshold concepts within a first year materials engineering module (Fundamentals of Materials) with the aim to explore whether recognising these concepts could help to improve the curriculum.

A threshold concept is more likely to be troublesome to understand, while not all troublesome areas are necessarily threshold concepts. By identifying troublesome areas within an engineering module we hoped to make a list of potential threshold concepts. Questionnaires aimed to identify troublesome areas within the module (for either students or staff) were prepared and distributed to students and staff. Student and staff interviews were also recorded and transcribed. Concept maps, developed from the data collected, facilitated visual analysis of the specific module with arrows linking related topics. This helped to identify prerequisite areas within the module on which understanding the more complex areas relies. As an example, from the concept maps, a troublesome area that students identified was how phase diagrams are used. While this concept was subsequently found to be soon understood, further investigation may reveal underlying threshold concepts that underpin how students understand the use of phase diagrams.

Other identified troublesome areas include 3D crystallographic visualisation, and understanding structure-property relationships relating materials to their applications. These three troublesome areas can be considered threshold concepts as they also seem to be transformative and irreversible.

Threshold concepts have been identified in a single 1st year materials engineering module. This can help to review and improve the existing curriculum by emphasising the identified concepts and developing appropriate teaching methods that help improve the understanding of the identified concepts.

Poster 33: Teaching of Materials Science in the University of Annaba, Algeria

M. Labaiz

Laboratory of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials, University BADJI Mokhtar, Algeria

The teaching of materials began in 1974. The first promotion of engineers came out in 1974. Currently, the materials science are taught in the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering. The training path is composed of LMD graduation (with ECTS) and Master in materials engineering. The number of student in graduation is 40. The number of doctoral students is 20.The staff of department consists of 15 professors, 10 associate professor, 05 lecturers. For research, there are four laboratories : laboratory of metallurgy, Laboratory of foundry, laboratory of metal forming, laboratory of physical metallurgy. The topics of research concerns mainly ArcelorMittal Annaba: The hot dip galvanized steels (adherence, surface defects), cold rolled sheet metal (defects on sheet, wear and lubrication of rolls), the hot rolling of sheet metal (thermal fatigue and wear of rolls).

Poster 34: Progress in active learning of Materials Science using CES resources

E. Lamani, Sh. Caslli, and D. Elezi

Polytechnic University of Tirana (PUT), Albania

At the Mechanical Engineering Faculty of  the PUT, courses dealing with materials are given in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Engineering programmes. Many of the students following these programmes, mostly in BSc level, have a modest preparation in the fundamental subjects and they are often not very motivated. Teaching them the materials science is a real challenge: we are forced to look for teaching methods to make the materials related courses more understandable and interesting, without compromising their scientific content. To face this challenge we are adopting the concepts of the Student-Centred Learning and those of the Project Based Learning. In such a context the tools and resources offered by CES software, proved to be extremely useful. We have introduced this software since 2001 with different aims, responding to the nature and level of different courses. For example, in Bsc level, we use the visualisations generated by CES Selector to clarify the taxonomy of materials and their attributes, to compare different materials on the base of specific properties, to introduce the concept of material index, to explain the philosophy of the designing of novel materials aiming to fill the empty areas in material-property charts, etc. In Msc level, students use selection charts and performance indices during interactive exercises, while more developed methods (selection with multiple constrains and compound objectives) are taught via micro-projects. Thanks to such approach we have obtained promising results in activating students and motivating them. Therefore we are working to extend it in other courses (environment engineering), developing new exercises and case studies.

This poster shows, by various examples, how we are introducing the Ashby method and the CES resources in our materials related courses.

Poster 35: CES‐based teaching experiences: online evaluation and group activities

F. M. Morales, D. L. Sales, T. Ben, F. J. Pacheco, M. Herrera, and R. García

Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I. M. y Q. I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz

The European Space for Higher Education requires adapted teaching structures towards student‐focused learning, giving the students an active role in their own curriculum. This demands higher interactivity of the learning process. On this purpose we have created a series of tools for training concepts of Materials Science and Engineering based on the CES‐EduPack software. This work shows, on one hand, autoassessed activities built under the Moodle virtual learning platform, consisting of (i) quizzes (with calculated, multiple choices, matching, true/false and numerical questions); and (ii) self‐directed lessons. On the other hand, some teamwork experiences are described. Among them, (iii) cooperative learning seminaries using the jigsaw or puzzle method to solve simple materials selection exercises; and (iv) the arrangement of a glass‐cabinet displaying engineering materials within common ‘everyday’ objects and a card with their main properties, classified by material families. We can conclude that all these tasks were fruitful and some statistics are added concerning the results obtained by students

Poster 36: Granta Design's Teaching Resources in Spanish

G. Olivella

Granta Design

The CES EduPack is a tool that was developed specifically to support teaching of Materials related topics in higher education. It serves both a science-led approach and a design-led approach. More than 800 universities worldwide now use it to support their teaching on Materials and also on Sustainability. There are a number of teaching resources available from our website that accompany the software: 200+ supporting materials that include powerpoint lectures, worked examples, exercises and white papers. These resources can be used freely by the academics as they see fit to support their teaching. Due to our growing commitment in Spanish speaking countries, Granta has helped create a community of scholars that is currently developing teaching resources specifically for Spanish speaking university curricula. The present poster presents the work done so far and future perspectives.

Poster 37: Designing out waste: to improve the sustainability of local trading

E. Onyshchenko

JCAMD, London Metropolitan University

These educational studies were initiated as a part of collaborative cross-disciplinary project in the Faculties of Art, Media & Design and Architecture of London Metropolitan University to improve the Aldgate area in East London. The project aims are to determine the potential for:

  • Innovative design
  • Increasing opportunities for urban farming
  • Bringing nature into urban spaces
  • Making markets fit for the 21st century

Today, plastics are extensively used in all areas of life and demand for their applications in packaging, building and construction is steadily growing. On the other hand, end-of-of use plastic product waste presents a major concern. Plastics can be recycled and re-used, however, collecting, cleaning, separating & converting the waste into useful and cost effective materials is a major challenge. The aim is to push a new perspective to embed re-use & recycling into the first generation product design.

The first part of the Aldgate Project has shown that the major contributor of plastic waste was polypropylene, extensively used for transporting fruit and vegetables. The early results from this work meet the aim of proposing a closed loop system that includes collection, recycling and re-use options.

The collaborative nature of the project creates a new innovative platform for cross-disciplinary education. 3rd Yr BA Architecture and MSc Polymer Science & Engineering students participate in live case-studies that are generating new teaching materials. The project will provide Polymer students & faculty clients with a unique opportunity to network with Art, Design & Architecture students as well as other clients, stakeholders & members of the local community from Aldgate. The students will benefit from the enriched educational resources available which will include live presentations by invited speakers, participation in shows & joint events, local guided tours as well as joint lectures and tutorials.

Poster 38: Energy and Carbon Footprint of Outdoor Equipment

A. Pfennig

HTW University of Applied Sciences Berlin, Mechanical Engineering

Since spring semester 2010 a project based course "Mechanical Engineering, Materials and Environment" is taught to undergraduate students in their 2nd year at the Applied University of Technology and Economics Berlin HTW. This year`s project topic was "Outdoor Equipment". The students worked on the eco audit of the parts they chose and were asked to redesign those in an environmentally friendly way. Therefore they disassembled the parts and analysed the materials or acquired information elsewhere. Finally they had to research on processing, materials and transportation. The data was processed with the Eco-Audit-Tool of CES by GrantaDesign. Changes could be easily made by substituting different materials where the processing and manufacturing phase dominated (camping chair). Solutions were worked out for examples where the use phase dominated, such as heaters and stoves, which were compared to each other. Comparing their own data to environmental data from industries with similar eco-audit outputs showed that even in the so-called eco friendly outdoor world there is little information available in public on precise data and on environmental impact.

Poster 39: Material teaching in industrial design education: a course on expressive-sensorial characterization of materials.

V. Rognoli and M. Levi

Facoltà del Design, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

The study of materials has always been regarded as a fundamental element in the industrial design education. The methodologies used for materials teaching in industrial design field were very different and have changed depending on the context, the historical period and on the basis of diverse approaches of various schools. For the designer it is important to know the materials for concretizing their projects and to know how to choose them according to different design requirements. Alternatively, it has been emphasized both the functional and engineering properties of materials and the expressive aspect with its sensory-perceptual qualities. Today, the international research community agrees that both of these dimensions are important for the design, but it is possible say that for the designer is more natural and instinctive to begin the materials selection from the sensorial-expressive characterization side. Relating on the results of this research, it was considered important to include the expressive-sensorial dimension of materials in design education. The paper presented here describes the project of a teaching course in expressive-sensorial characterization of materials for design. We will illustrate his structure and his theoretical contents. We will describe some useful tools for this type of approach to material education such as expressive-sensorial atlases and such as material library. We will discuss about practical exercises developed to build students' awareness with such issues, and we will give some suggestions to build the new one. Great emphasis it will be given to the technological dimension of materials for design, because we think that it is very important issue in expressive-sensorial dimension. In fact, materials for design must be considered simultaneously as physical entities, with its properties and qualities, but also as objects subjected to various processes for their formal and superficial transformation. In fact, the expressive-sensorial characterization of materials could be very influenced from manufacturing processes and finishing. In conclusion, the paper should be interesting as a practical and direct experience in design material education, for what it has already been done and for what it is still possible to do in this field.

Poster 40: Integrated selection of materials and processes within collaborative industrial design educational projects

C. Vila, G. M. Bruscas, and L. Cabedo

Department of Industrial Systems Engineering and Design, Universitat Jaume I, Spain

European industries are trying to be more competitive and sustainable and they are making great efforts for improving their product design and development process through value-added products. New products should have not only innovative features but also they must be sustainable through all his lifecycle. In engineering education technical subjects and the use of computer aided tools are taught separately and there is no integrated vision of real product process development. In general, this lack in the basic engineering curriculum overlooks the necessity of teaching valuable skills in the areas of:

  • Team management and workgroup management in cross-functional distributed teams,
  • Identification and resolution of manufacturing problems due to inefficient designs,
  • Efficient collaboration between designers and manufacturers, and
  • Lifecycle management and workflow management for product development.

Project based experiences claim that, in the future, engineering education must integrate different perspectives into the classroom to foster multidisciplinary distributed collaborative product development.

Therefore, the role of educational organizations is to train future engineers and industrial designer with skills that help companies to achieve new social demands and optimize internal processes. These abilities should include not only technical knowledge, engineering design methods and the use of computer aided applications but also the cross functional integration of them.

In this direction we present some efforts to overcome these curriculum limitations through an educational project that is focused on teaching collaborative practices for industrial design within a master’s degree in design and manufacturing. The Integrated Selection of Materials and Processes module is given in the first semester of a Master of Design and Manufacturing degree at Jaume I University (Spain). The module includes three courses where the students learn the fundamentals of advanced manufacturing processes, design for manufacturing and material and processes selection. From the beginning of the module a project with design requirements is assigned to each team and a collaborative project is conducted during the semester. The goal of the project course is to simulate the collaborative product development and exploring the continuous feedback of geometric design, material selection and manufacturing restrictions. In this approach teams work in the early stages with CAD/CAE tools and they explore the potential of CES EduPack. The main idea is to present a framework for teaching collaborative design and manufacturing concepts using the integrated selection of material and processes. The work will show the methodological use of these tools and the different projects developed by the students.

With this methodology we are trying to demonstrate the advantages of learning by “doing” and “experiencing” and we have found that the students’ interest in these product design and development experiences allows them to learn quickly as they explore new challenges.

Poster 41: Is there a future for teaching metallurgy in Belgium?

V. Vitry, A. Aubert, and F. Delaunois

University of Mons (UMONS), Belgium

Background and motivation

Due to industrial reconversion and numerous closing down factories in the metallurgical and manufacturing sector; studying metallurgy loses popularity in Belgium. Materials Science, and particularly metallurgy, is only taught at engineering level in this country. In the last 15 years, all Metallurgy degree programs have been either stopped or replaced by Materials Science diplomas. For instance, by decree, Materials Science and Chemistry  are joined in a single engineering master degree. As a result, the place of Metallurgy has decreased in the engineering curriculum and Chemical Metallurgy has been all but abandoned.

However, our experience is that our graduates are in demand, both in industry and research. The Belgian metallurgical and manufacturing sector looks for engineers with a strong background in either (or both) chemical and physical metallurgy. Universities and research centers lack researchers specialized in this area.  What was done? Methods used and why?

As part of the accreditation process of our engineering master degrees, we have investigated this issue. Graduates (from years 2000 to 2011) were asked to specify their current employment field and whether/how they make use of the Metallurgy component of their engineering education. As key stakeholders, employers were contacted in order to better know, quantitatively and qualitatively, their needs in Metallurgy specialists vs. Materials Science generalists.

  • Results, i.e., include some evidence and analysis. What was found?
  • Conclusions and significance, including wider application

We will present the main findings of these surveys and their possible impact on our curriculum and the way we promote it to students and local industries. Some of the conclusions stress that even if Metallurgy is still in demand, we must find a better balance between core specialized modules and interdisciplinary approaches to strengthen the competence in innovation of our engineers.

Poster 42: Explore and Practice for Engineering Education Models in Materials

M. Wang, X. Jin and H. Lu

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

With the general development of China, it is important to have high-level engineers and scientists. However, the traditional training model in Chinese university has its difficulties to meet the needs of high-level engineers and scientists with the development of modern industry. How to train creative engineering talents becomes a challenge for all engineering education majors.

The speciality of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, is based on some creative and international training goals. We designed an all-round training system for high-level engineering talents and focused on basic professional education, engineering quality and ability training and all-round training models.

During the training of high-level engineering talented students, we focus on the following steps.

  • Global Audition: Designing engineering topics; Arranging group discussion; Judging students as whole overall quality, such as logic analyzer and organizational communication skills.
  • Course System: offering engineering courses, such as Introduction to Materials Engineering, Materials engineering Forum, Material manufacturing processes and equipment, Engineering material properties and selection, Quality management of Materials production process, Project Management, curriculum design, etc.
  • Internship: Arranging students to attend internship. Through internships, students can know about enterprises and train themselves. Some talented students can do engineering research under the professor and engineer’s guidance.
  • Internationalization: Hiring famous professors in materials science and engineers, related to transnational corporation multinationals. Besides engineering and English courses, students will learn professional knowledge and creative courses as well. Otherwise, we focus on cooperating with some engineering institutes and providing duel-degree and exchange programs.

We highly desire to deepen collaboration with famous enterprises and universities overseas and train high-level talented students in materials science and engineering as well.

Poster 43: Added values of international collaboration in
modernisation of Heat Treatment and Surface engineering education

Z. Kolozsváry1, M. K. Baán2

  1. SC Plasmaterm SA, Romania
  2. University of Miskolc, Hungary

As part of an IFHTSE (International Federation of Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering) initiative, named „Global 21” - aiming at creating a framework for a continuous study on the state of the art and expected development trends in heat treatment and surface engineering in the early years of the 21st century – also education and training programmes available in this field were studied. Versatility of training needs at different levels and a definite decrease in the availability of training opportunities have been noticed, while some innovative, new forms and programmes were also introduced. As a main conclusion, e-learning has been recognised as the only training methodology that will be suitable for such vocational training.

Parallel to the Global 21 project – lead by Dr Zoltán Kolozsváry, CEO of SC Plasmaterm SA, Romania, and IFHTSE Treasurer – two EU supported projects developed new methodology and training materials in the topics of Surface Engineering. ‘INNOVATE’ Project – International On-Line [email protected] Training in Surface Engineering, 2001-2004 – aimed at focusing the methodology: based on a flexible, resource-based curriculum design system, a set of multilingual training materials as elements of a variety of courses have been developed and tested in three different e-learning platforms. Built on these experiences, the MinSE project – supported by the EU Socrates programme, 2006-2009 – aimed at designing, developing and testing a Bologna-conform course leading to a European Master’s qualification in heat treatment and surface engineering. The part-online, part face-to-face course have been developed by a consortium of five universities and five industrial partners, while IFHTSE provided secretariat and professional networking background.

Follow-up activities of the mentioned projects and experiences of pilots were discussed in different conference papers and workshops, leading to the recent decision of IFHTSE to launch an education and training project. Consideration is being given to building a portal leading to all authoritative suppliers of online CD/DVD hard copy courses and material for education and training in heat treatment and surface engineering.

A questionnaire, to be circulated to members of related professional networks inviting information and comment on this and other possible actions in this area is now being drafted.

Poster 44: Using CES EduPack in chemical and materials engineering

M. Bassyouni1, S. Gutub2, Shereen M.-S. Abdel-Hamid3

  1. Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University,
    Rabigh, Saudi Arabia
  2. Department of Civil Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  3. Department of Chemical Engineering, Higher Technological Institute, Tenth of Ramadan, Egypt

In many colleges of engineering, it is used to hold the open day in the second semester of the first year of engineering. In this day, the students attend short sessions to discuss with each department’s representative about the type of study, importance and applications of that department and job opportunities for the concerned discipline. Based on these sessions, the students rank their priorities to join the department.

In 2010, faculty of engineering at King Abdulaziz University – Rabigh (KAU-R) had only three departments: (Mechanical, Industrial and Electrical) engineering. The dean of the faculty suggested establishing two departments more; Chemical & Materials engineering and Civil engineering departments. He expected that few numbers of students would join these two departments in 2011 because of few numbers of staff and no old students exist before to guide and encourage the new comers to join these two new departments.

The dean nominated Dr. Bassyouni from the department of Chemical & Materials Engineering to present a short lecture (15 minutes) about the field, importance, applications, and job opportunities of the Chemical and Materials Engineering department.

The objective of this lecture was to maximize the number of students who were interested in Chemical and Materials Engineering department. The constraints were the period of the lecture should not exceed 15 minutes; all points should be covered very clear. The free variables were to use all possible teaching tools and means.

Actually, Dr. Bassyouni used different colored bubbled charts from CES EduPack and description of some materials processing to cover the parts of materials engineering in that presentation. He tried to show the students how the scientists of materials do select the materials for different applications in Chemical engineering such as reactors, heat exchangers, distillation columns and vessels. It does not depend only on physical, mechanical, chemical properties of materials but also to derive mathematical models to obtain the material index. He tried to keep the lecture interesting by showing some colored maps of materials and explaining the applications instead of presenting long lists of tables of materials properties.

The students who decided to join the department of Chemical and Materials Engineering in 2011 were around 40% of the first year students!!! When the vice dean asked the students “why so many students are interested in Chemical & Materials Engineering?” the students answered “because the lecture on the open day was so much useful”.

Actually, without the interesting, understandable colored bubble maps and illustrated materials processing in the database of CES EduPack, the lecturer would not show the importance, how much the materials are constructive within a part of 15 minutes of the lecture. Similar case was happened in the department of Chemical Engineering at the Higher Technological Institute in Egypt.

Poster 45: The role play as a teaching innovation in materials

M. Nuria Salán
Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering Department
UPC - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (BarcelonaTECH)

The incorporation of European universities in the EHEA has led to the restructuring of curricula and in the redefinition of protagonismes in the process of teaching and learning in universities. Thus, the paradigm of Bologna has contributed to the gradual incorporation of skills, processes of continuous assessment, self-assessment and co-assessment, which favors students to become part of the learning process itself.

Meanwhile, in recent years, the diversity of available formats to share information (text, images, simulations, video) has helped the teaching practice to be more flexible and thus contributed to promoting the participation of students. In the scope of materials, communication technologies have helped to visualize processes, manage databases of material selection and to optimize the contributions of attention in university teaching.

In this scenario, the project RIMA (from Catalan - Research and Innovation in Learning Methodologies) is intended to promote the activities undertaken by groups of interest (Communities of Practice) that have been created by the UPC. Among them, the group Innovation in Teaching Materials, GidMAT, provides a place of communion and sharing of experiences and a forum for discussion among professionals in teaching materials.

This paper proposes a role-playing activity as a practical activity of materials in the field of engineering. The teacher-student interaction is essential and the proposed methodology ensures constant communication and efficient feedback that enables continuous evaluation of subjects in materials technology.