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2nd Asian Materials Education Symposium: Posters

Confirmed poster presenters, kindly sponsored by the Materials Research Society of Singapore

 MRS Singapore

Confirmed poster presenters

poster
number
Speaker Affiliation Topic
1 Prof. Dong Zhi-Li Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Challenges in Research Driven Materials Science Education
2 Prof. Sujeet Sinha Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India Selection of polymers, polymer-composites and coatings for tribological applications
3 Prof. Arlindo Silva Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore Teaching of Engineering Materials with Sample Materials: The SUTD Experience
4 Dr. Pippa Newby Education Division, Granta Design, UK Introducing Bioengineering concepts to Engineering and Material Science students
5 Prof. Kazuaki Inaba Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan Team-oriented cross-border entrepreneur cultivating (CBEC) program at Tokyo Tech
6 Dr. Jonathan Trisno Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore Bootstrapping Materials Research By Demystifying Processes In The Cleanroom
7 Dr. Dongbo Wei Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, PR China Characteristics and Progress of “Science and Engineering of Metals” Internationalized Curriculum in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics
8 Dr Lee Phillips Education Division, Granta Design, UK Resources to Support Teaching of Materials Science and Engineering
9 Prof. Michael Budig Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore Lamination processes for the design of spatial and multi-performative structural surfaces
10 Marc Fry Education Division, Granta Design, UK Processing principles - Which are the most important
11 Dr. Aaron Goh Suk Meng Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore The Scooter as a vehicle to teach materials
12 Dr. Kyozo Arimoto Arimotech Ltd, Japan Development of method for obtaining experiential understanding of elastic and plastic properties of materials using hand coil-winding operation
13 Prof. Kui Zhang University of Reims Champagne, France Materials and the Environment — Eco-Informed Material Choice

Poster Abstracts

Challenges in Research Driven Materials Science Education

Prof. Dong Zhi-Li, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

In the First Asian Materials Education Symposium, I shared my teaching experience in my course Materials Characterization, that covers crystallography, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of materials. I focused mainly on how to effectively teach students who were from different disciplines, including materials science, physics, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and chemical engineering. In this symposium, I would like to share how to effectively teach students from materials science area only. For the same Materials Characterization (NTU MS7003) course, some students were eager to learn how to characterize crystal structures using diffraction techniques, whereas other students wanted to understand whether they can analyze the electronic structure of crystals and how they can get information on the oxidation state of an element in a compound crystal.
In their research projects related to functional materials, such information can help them better understand the structure – property relationships. Such requirements suggest us to include electron energy loss spectrum analysis in the TEM part, and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis in the X-ray analysis part, which means we not only teach theories on imaging and diffraction, but also on spectroscopy. The expansion of the content in Materials Characterization (NTU MS7003) challenges the materials science faculty as we need to explain much more quantum physics principles to our students. Meanwhile, the students majoring in materials science and engineering need to read more quantum physics and solid state physics textbooks. Our discussions with students indicates that this course can truly help them understand materials structures and material behaviors in a more complicated fashion.


Selection of polymers, polymer-composites and coatings for tribological applications

Prof. Sujeet Sinha, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India

While polymeric materials have been applied in tribological applications since 1960s, their usage in mechanically demanding environments have been quite few. Many polymer-composites are now available for applications such as in gears, bearing, seals, brakes, tyres, medical implants etc. Polymeric coatings in tribology are very recent developments which can also provide excellent opportunities in industrial applications. In this paper, a survey of polymeric materials will be presented. Some materials selection rules based on scratch and wear maps will be introduced for different industrial applications. The new developing field of polymeric tribological coatings will be presented and a few major challenges will be highlighted.


Teaching of Engineering Materials with Sample Materials: The SUTD Experience

Prof. Arlindo Silva, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

The Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) has acquired a comprehensive set of material samples from the Materials Connexion and is augmenting this with a variety of samples from other sources to better support the teaching needs. Managed by the SUTD Library, these samples are being used by faculty members to complement their teaching of engineering materials. This poster will illustrate how these samples have been and could be effectively integrated into the various courses taught at SUTD.


Introducing Bioengineering concepts to Engineering and Material Science students

Dr. Pippa Newby, Education Division, Granta Design, UK

Bioengineering is one of the fastest growing sectors in engineering with pushes to support an ever growing and aging global population. This cross-disciplinary topic attracts a wide range of scientists and engineers with highly diverse backgrounds. Bioengineering combines biology with engineering and students with bioengineering degrees are desirable for their high level of cross-disciplinary knowledge. The issue faced by engineering and material science degrees is how do they introduce this rapidly relevant topic to their students in courses that are already filled with important content to increase the employability of their students. The opposite problem is faced by bioengineering and biomedical degrees, in that how do they teach their students about material and their properties and tie that information into course.
By using the Bioengineering Edition of CES EduPack along with the ASM Medical Materials Devices Database, students can be introduced to the material properties of materials used in FDA and EU approved devices along with comparing common engineering materials used in other industries such as Aerospace and Mechanical to an overview of the different uses in a variety of industries. Through the use of industry case studies bioengineering students can be introduced to material selection methodology used in the design process by considering not only the biological considerations of a biomedical device but the mechanical properties such as compressional strength and young’s modulus.
These case studies can also inspire engineering students to consider the requirements of a device in terms of the biological considerations such as matching the mechanical strength of bone from CES EduPack and exploring the surface roughness of a materials so cells with adhere to the surface from ASM Medical Materials Devices Database. Exploring the world of bioengineering in terms of the mechanical properties will enhance the cross-disciplinary learning for both bioengineering and engineering students.


Team-oriented cross-border entrepreneur cultivating (CBEC) program at Tokyo Tech

Prof. Kazuaki Inaba, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

The goal of the Japan Ministry of Education’s EDGE Program is to train talented individuals who will foster innovation; who come from specialized fields; who have a wide-ranging vision; who possess an entrepreneurial mind and skills for discovering and solving problems; and who are natural business people.
In our CBEC Program, we train individuals to foster innovation by working together as a team that transcends borders—including gender, cultural, and academic differences—to allow for many different personal values while preserving independent collaborative relationships with various stakeholders. In addition to training individuals who will have a mindset for challenging themselves to create new businesses; who will have knowledge of marketing, finance, and other related subjects; who will be able to collaborate with multidisciplinary, international teams; and who will have agile prototyping skills, the CBEC Program also takes on the challenge of developing solutions to problems faced by both society and industry and promotes diversity by teaching students from other domestic and overseas universities together with people in the workforce. For such students, we have started teaching “Material Selection for Engineering Design” in Engineering Science and Design (graduate major) at Tokyo Institute of Technology from this school year 2016.
The course focuses on the way of material selection when people design something and topics include physical properties, mechanical characteristics, thermal behaviors, electrical responses, durability, processing, and environmental issues. At the end of this course, students will learn how to select materials which students want to design by learning basics of material selection through exercise and case studies with CES EduPack.


Bootstrapping Materials Research By Demystifying Processes In The Cleanroom

Dr Jonathan Trisno, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

Nanofabrication is an integral part of materials research. However, hands-on skills are usually gained through the course of experimentation. Unfamiliarity with equipment and processes in the cleanroom is one of the main barriers for students and researchers to start research in materials and nanofabrication. We designed a course with the purpose of reducing this ”activation-energy” for students to enter the world of Nanofabrication.
Lectures and case studies, in-depth understanding on state-of-the-art patterning and microscopy process, and discussions have allowed students from different background and research groups in SUTD to collaborate on project based learning. Focusing on both the technical and experimental aspects, the course includes final project involving the design, simulation, fabrication, and characterization of Nanostructures. We will present student projects that showcase their very first experience of working in the cleanroom.


Characteristics and Progress of “Science and Engineering of Metals” Internationalized Curriculum in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Dr. Dongbo Wei, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, PR China

The paper introduced the characteristics of “Science and Engineering of Metals” internationalized curriculum in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, as well as some enlightenments gained from these curriculum. Based on the construction experience of summer school, NUAA offered “Science and Engineering of Metals” internationalized curriculum to the junior (3rd year) students as an optional course in November 2015 for the first time. We carried out massive reformations in course content, teaching pattern and evaluation mode and received good effect. some specific work experiences were introduced in the paper. Furthermore, some reform measures were discussed and forecasted in materials education under international background and China's actual conditions. At last, the paper introduced the salary and other benefits provided by NUAA for part time foreign teacher.


Resources to Support Teaching of Materials Science and Engineering

Dr. Lee Phillips, Education Division, Granta Design, UK

For the last two years, Granta Design has worked with external academic collaborators, including Stephane Gorsse of the ICMCB institute in France, to develop a suite of new resources to support introductory Materials Science and Engineering courses. In response to feedback from educators in the field, we have concentrated on three main areas. Firstly, we have integrated new data to support the teaching of Functional Materials and Biomaterials, which allow selection on new attributes including piezo/pyroelectric, magnetic, semiconducting and thermoelectric properties. Secondly, we have developed a prototype Phase Diagram Tool for teaching about the phase stability, microstructures and process-structure relations in several technologically important binary and ternary systems. Thirdly, we have created a unique “Process Property Profiles” database and teaching resources to enable students to explore the interactions between processing of materials and their properties. All of these items are now ready as prototypes for those that use CES EduPack to try out with their students.
The Phase Diagram Tool Prototype is available to all. This poster is designed to show you what we have been doing, and to encourage you to try them out and give us valuable feedback.


Lamination processes for the design of spatial and multi-performative structural surfaces

Prof. Michael Budig, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

Advanced skills in craftsmanship are not merely expressed on the surface of artefacts, but in the articulation and precision of their joints. The goal of the on-going research presented here is to develop novel techniques and methods of additive fabrication, with a particular focus on the assembly of sheet materials. Initial findings and outlines for an exploratory research framework to initiate unprecedented investigations will be discussed here. The scope goes beyond conventional panellised construction and panel deformation methods by breaking basic building elements down into the thinnest layers. The research describes advanced assembly techniques for gradient structural properties by controlling material densities and layer compositions within the building elements.
The investigations so far have been conducted in two parallel strands: empirical research into the lamination of sheet materials to design self-supportive structural surfaces with potentially varied architectural applications and concurrent design research studios that offered a variety of speculative approaches. Through a series of physical design prototypes, the research aims to derive fabrication processes that coalesce the two performative goals of improved structural capability and enhanced functionality. Morphologically, the hierarchy of the lamination layers plays a crucial role in determining the global form of the assemblies in addition to governing the structural and spatial behaviour. Hence, the experiments take advantage of modulating layers in different configuration to increase possible performative properties.
In a first stage the studies focus on the rules, behaviour and effect of existing uniform hierarchy. This phenomenon of uniformity is then tweaked to develop a concept, for which the term ‘dynamic hierarchy’ is coined, wherein the strict order and differentiation of layers is intercepted to generate an interchangeable hierarchical layering system. This opens a plethora of unexplored morphology design solution space having a wide range of effective applications.


Processing principles - Which are the most important

Hannah Melia, Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK

Making components, out of materials and using processes, and achieving a result that is cost-effective, functional and high quality, requires an understanding of how materials, processes and design features interact. Granta Design has started a project to create new teaching resources to support students as they try to learn about this area. One objective is to help engineering students ask the right questions when they go into industry. Another is to guide the use of product disassembly as a learning tool. And students also need to see how the processing of materials can create advantages in a product, rather than merely being a constraint.
We would like to provide the following:
1. A concise description of the most important "Process Principles" (about 10 or so). Processing principles are combinations of materials and processes, such as injection molding thermoplastics and die casting metals.
2. For each Process Principle we would like to identify 5 or so design issues explaining the key characteristics that you need to know about the process and its coupling to material and design parameters, and the underlying science behind these interactions.
3. Product examples / case studies, with pictures of components and descriptions to show how components were made, and how the design of these components relates to the design issues identified above.
4. Teaching resources about taking products apart and identifying the materials and processes used. The next step in this project is to talk with educators teaching this topic, to identify which processing principles and design issues should be covered and how best we can do this. The poster will describe our current thinking. We look forward to speaking with you.


The Scooter as a Vehicle to Teach Materials

Dr. Aaron Goh Suk Meng, Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore

TBA


Development of method for obtaining experiential understanding of elastic and plastic properties of materials using hand coil-winding operation

Dr. Kyozo Arimoto, Arimotech Ltd, Japan
Prof. Hiroyuki Narahara, Department of Mechanical Information Science and Technology, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan

Elastic and plastic properties of various materials generally measured by dedicated testing machines have been published in literatures and saved as database. Understanding them not only numerically but also experientially may be meaningful for students. A classic research showed the ratio of Young’s modulus and yield strength relates to coil diameter changes between before and after a springback phenomenon in a wire wound on an arbor. In this research, therefore, three different diameter wires made of six kinds of metals were wound by hand on different diameter arbors and their coil diameters after the springback were measured by each student. Individual forces applied to wires and springback phenomena in coils were memorized as an experience by each student. For understanding deeply the phenomena based on the theory of strength of materials, we made an exercise to evaluate the measured diameter changes of coils using the relation obtained by previous studies. Each student’s experiential work was achieved by especially using reasonable DIY wires. CES EduPack was used to strengthen weak information of their properties by students.


Materials and the Environment — Eco-Informed Material Choice

Prof. Kui Zhang, University of Reims Champagne, France
Cui Xia, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Press, China

Materials and the Environment—Eco-Informed Material Choice (2nd Edition), written by Michael F. Ashby, Prof. of Cambridge University (UK), FRS&NAE, provides a tool-box —perspective, background, methods and data for thinking about and designing with materials to minimize their environmental impact or minimizing cost. Organized into 14 chapters, the book first explains where materials come from and how they are used, along with their life cycle and their relationship to energy and carbon. It then examines control and economic instruments that hinder the use of engineering materials, considers sustainability from a materials perspective, and highlights the importance of low-carbon power and material efficiency. It contains numerous case studies and full-color data sheets for 63 of the most widely used materials. This book will help students of Engineering and Materials Science, as well as materials scientists or and engineers in analyzing and responding to environmental concerns. The book was first translated into Chinese and published by Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. Press in 2016.


Once accepted:

  1. The posters should be a maximum size of A1 (841mm x 594mm or 33.1in x 23.39in).
  2. Portrait mode is preferred (as opposed to landscape mode).
  3. We will have the backing boards and the poster pins, so all that people will need to supply is the poster itself.

* Posters presented at the Singapore Symposium have been assessed by a panel of judges. Cash prizes sponsored by the Materials Research Society of Singapore will be awarded to top posters.

 MRS Singapore