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2017 Program
9th International Materials Education Symposium

Poster Teaser Session

2017 Program, 9th International Materials Education Symposium

Symposium Day One: Thursday, April 6

time session
8.00 am Registration, Coffee, and Poster setup
8.45 am Prof. Mike Ashby, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, UK
Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
Welcome Address
  SESSION 1: INNOVATION IN MATERIALS EDUCATION
9.00am Session Chairs
Prof. Maria Knutsen Wendel,
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
Prof. Sybrand van der Zwaag,
Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Session Introductions
9.05 am Prof. Lorna Gibson, Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
“Flipped” classes on mechanical behaviour of materials at MIT
9.25 am Prof. Mark Miodownik, University College London, UK
Materials in relation to making - an alternative way to teach materials science
9.45 am Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
Poster Teasers
25 x Poster Presenters invited to give a one-minute presentation
10.10 am One-hour Poster Session
Coffee
11.10 am Dr. Jessica Sandland, Office of Digital Learning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Developing an Online Materials Science and Engineering Curriculum
11.30 am Hannah Melia, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
A New Resource Suite for CES EduPack to Support Teaching of Materials Science and Engineering
11.50 am Mark Endean, The Open University, UK
Manufacture materials design – bringing manufacturing studies up to date
12.10 pm Dr. Javier Orozco Messana, Univeristat Politècnica de València, Spain
Learning materials in context: class projects for companies
12.30 pm Session discussion led by the session chair
12.45 pm Lunch
  SESSION 2: PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE REAL WORLD
1:40pm Session Chairs
Prof. Lorna Gibson,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Assoc. Prof. Paul Eason,
University of North Florida, USA
Session Introductions
1.45 pm DEBATE
Undergraduate Materials Teaching: have we got it right?
Prof. Angela Dean, University of Derby, UK
Prof. Sybrand van der Zwaag, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Discussion moderator:
Prof. Mike Ashby, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, UK
2.30 pm Prof. Maria Knutson Wedel, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
Preparing students for life-long learning
2.50 pm Dr. Noel Rutter, Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK
What sort of Materials Education does Industry need?
3.10 pm Afternoon Tea
3.40 pm Prof. Sybrand van der Zwaag, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Comparing educational goals and methods for teaching materials science in China and Western Europe
4.00 pm Dr. Koichi Ohtomi, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Design Education Program for Engineers at the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers
4.20 pm Dr. Alexandre Mege-Revil and Dr. Amina Tandjaoui, Centrale Lille, France
Teaching circular economy principles: how to introduce a mole in companies
4.40 pm Dr. Joanna Bates, University of Sheffield, UK
A sweeter way of teaching health and safety
5.00 pm Session discussion led by the session chair
5.25 pm Introduction to the next Symposia, Marc Fry, Education Division, Granta Design, UK
5.45 pm Close and symposium photograph
6.45 pm Symposium Dinner, Gonville & Caius College—all attendees welcome (pre-registration required)

 

Symposium Day Two: Friday, April 7

time session
8.30 am Registration and Coffee
  SESSION 3: MEETING INDUSTRY NEEDS
9.00 am Session Chairs
Mark Endean,
The Open University, UK
Prof. Steffan Ritter,
Reutlingen University, Germany
Session Introductions
9.05 am Prof. George Smith, Oxford University, UK
Schools Liaison: From Fantasy to Fact
9.25 am Assoc. Prof. Karen Pantleon, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Industry inspires education – education integrates industry
9.45 am Prof. Luc Salvo, University Grenoble Alpes, France
Composite selection for electronic packaging: case study and software development
10.05 am Dr. Laura Katharina Thurn, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Germany
Strategy of Education on Materials for Students and Industry
10.25 am Coffee
11.00 am Prof. Steffen Ritter, Reutlingen University, Germany
Inspire their desire - balanced learning with real industrial projects
11.20 am Paul Eason, University of North Florida, USA
Creating the Advanced Manufacturing Workforce Industry Needs
11:40 am Prof. Andy Horsewell, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Learning Materials Engineering Inspired by Industry
12:00 pm Prof. José Ygnacio Pastor, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
A Tale about a MOOC: Development and Running of an Analysis of Experimental Data Course
12.20 pm Session discussion led by the session chair
12.45 pm Lunch
  SESSION 4: MATERIALS AND DESIGN
  Session Chairs
Dr. Noel Rutter,
University of Cambridge, UK
Prof. Mark Miodownik,
University College London, UK
Session Introductions
1.45 pm Prof. Dr.-Ing Gerhard Glatzel, Hochschule für Bildende Künste Braunschweig, Germany
The Materials Library – Concept and Implementation in a Multidisciplinary Field
2.05 pm Prof. Barbara Del Curto, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
“Materials Selection Criteria” full immersion: practicing materials selection with industry
2.25 pm Assoc. Prof. Frederic Veer, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Materials science for designing engineers, the evolution from abstract science to life time skills
2.45 pm Dr. Valentina Rognoli and Camilo Ayala Garcia, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Getting Inspired by Materials - Materials Selection from a Designer’s Perspective
3.05 pm Afternoon Tea
3.30 pm Camilo Ayala Garcia and Dr. Valentina Rognoli, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
DIY materials approach for materials education in product design
3.50 pm Max Fickel, Royal College of Art, UK
From STEM to STEAM: A Blueprint for a Transdisciplinary Research and Teaching Lab
4.10 pm Session discussion led by the session chair
4.30pm Close and survivors photograph


Presentation Abstracts

“Flipped” classes on mechanical behaviour of materials at MIT

Prof. Lorna Gibson, Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT developed its course on Mechanical Behavior of Materials as a MOOC on edX in 2013-2014. The residential version of the course at MIT has evolved since then. In 2014, the traditional format was offered, with the MOOC available as a supplement. In 2015, the subject was flipped, with MIT students watching the online lecture videos, doing the online problem sets and attending weekly tutorials taught by the faculty. In 2016, the subject was again flipped, with some modifications, based on the experience and student feedback.


Materials in relation to making - an alternative way to teach materials science

Prof. Mark Miodownik, University College London, UK

Watch the video: Hear Prof. Miodownik speak about his project, "Design Led Materials Science Teaching" >

This video describes a project based approach to teaching materials science which uses the making of objects as a way to introduce core concepts in materials science. I describe the philosophy behind the approach, and take the viewer through the course by describing how the students design, make and test objects, and in the process learn the core principles of materials science. This approach seeks to address two issues in the teaching of materials science.
Firstly I address the issue of the balance between learning through the study of theory, versus learning through doing. In this approach I seek to give equal balance to these two modes of learning, which inevitably leads to a reduced level of theoretical understanding compared to a traditional approach. I submit that this is because traditional courses tend to omit learning through doing which allows more time for theory. However the advantages of a making approach is a more holistic and intuitive understanding of materials and their relationship to design, manufacturing, history and culture.
Secondly, in the face of an ever increasing set of materials technologies year on year, traditional materials science course have had to face difficult choices to avoid syllabus bloat. The subject is now just so vast, that knowing what to include and what to omit is an increasingly conflicting choice. The approach I present addresses this problem by using a design approach to foreground the materials choices faced by manufacturers, and attempts to train the students to learn theory as and when they need it to reach materials solutions. Ultimately the aim is to give the students confidence to learn how to learn about materials.


Developing an Online Materials Science and Engineering Curriculum

Dr. Jessica Sandland, Office of Digital Learning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are no longer in their infancy. Thousands of MOOCs have been developed for platforms such as edX and Coursera, and new courses are being added regularly [1,2]. MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering has already developed six such MOOCs for edX based on undergraduate and graduate courses that are currently offered at our institution, and we are currently in the process of developing several more. Ultimately, our goal is to create a comprehensive set of online Material Science and Engineering courses that represent a broad base of MS&E topics at both the introductory and the advanced level. Our department has many motivations for undertaking the development of a full online curriculum.
Certainly, it represents a commitment to provide interested learners around the world with free and open access to a substantial portion of our MS&E curriculum. Additionally, many of our course development goals focus on our on-campus students. We aim to give our students resources that will provide them with a flexible and innovative educational experience. This talk details our experiences in bringing our MS&E curriculum online. We describe our current course offerings, and we discuss the challenge of creating online courses that preserve the rigor of university-level classes. We also discuss the opportunity that online course development gives us to develop a broad set of resources for our students, and we outline the various ways that these resources are being used in our classrooms-- as digital textbooks, in flipped classrooms, and in courses that use online resources as an integral part of their course pedagogy. Finally, we detail our future path forward in online course development. [1] “Coursera” Accessed September 27, 2016. https://www.coursera.org/courses. [2] “edX.org.” Accessed September 27, 2016. https://www.edx.org/course.


A New Resource Suite for CES EduPack to Support Teaching of Materials Science and Engineering

Hannah Melia, Education Division, Granta Design, UK

Materials Science and Engineering is an increasingly complex subject. The universe of materials is growing in tandem with the demands of new technological applications, while materials decisions must evolve to accommodate sustainable development, regulations and global supply chains. In this context, it is essential to equip new generations to thrive in a fast moving knowledge-based economy, and so the role of Materials educators is more challenging and important than ever before. Educators around the world report pressure from stakeholders to introduce new relevant topics while maintaining student engagement, and balancing quality with workload. We are currently enhancing CES EduPack with a suite of new resources targeted at introductory Materials Science and Engineering courses and have focused on three main areas.
New data on Functional Materials and Biomaterials allows selection on piezo/pyroelectric, magnetic, semiconducting and thermoelectric properties. A prototype Phase Diagram Tool targets conceptual sticking points in phase stability and process-structure relations across technologically important systems. Finally, a unique “Process-Property Profiles” database enables students to explore interactions between material processing, properties and performance. These developments have been made using a new open development process at Granta Design, with emphasis on collaboration and feedback from educators. This talk will provide an overview of progress made so far and will review opportunities to engage with the materials education community to maximise the impact of these developments on global education.


Manufacture materials design – bringing manufacturing studies up to date

Mark Endean, The Open University, UK

Students at The Open University (OU) are just coming to the end of the first presentation of a new incarnation of a longstanding module in manufacturing technology. The latest version reflects current trends in the delivery of distance education, tempered by OU policy and practice: it is presented entirely online none of the study material is supplied in print none of the formats of downloadable files is optimised for printing interactive material included in some downloadable formats is only accessible on a limited range of devices. The learning materials themselves are designed with high levels of interactivity to promote student engagement.
Many of the learning activities require students to locate and access journal articles and manufacturers’ information, and then to update information provided about manufacturing processes or to create new process descriptions. Engagement in the learning activities is encouraged by an assessment strategy that focuses on the demonstration of high level cognitive skills such as critical analysis of information and decision-making. So what has the reaction been to this radical overhaul of a legacy module?
Early, anecdotal feedback from more vocal students has been almost entirely negative. Students have complained about: a lack of printed material depriving them of their customary study methods the poor quality of printed versions of online material the requirement to be online, reducing the flexibility afforded by traditional distance learning approaches an assessment strategy that does not reward knowledge acquisition and regurgitation. Formal feedback will be available in early 2017 and may corroborate or dilute these early views. An action plan is already being formulated to address the immediately apparent shortcomings of the first presentation, which will be adapted in response to formal feedback. The crucial outcome will be identification of aspects of innovation that students can adapt to and those that go too far.


Learning materials in context: class projects for companies

Dr. Javier Orozco Messana, Univeristat Politècnica de València, Spain

Background: Project Based Learning (PBL) has been extensively used for engaging students in real, meaningful problems. The related learning processes develop a deeper understanding which is hampered sometimes by artificial problem design. In order to overcome these limitations the methodology has been put to work with selected companies who provide, not only the information and materials required, but also mentors and the possibility of later participation in internship programs. Methods: Within the course "New materials in Architecture", last year students from Building Engineering at UPV are grouped in 3-4 students teams and are assigned a project related to the design/selection of a material for refurbishing a specific building (or neighbourhood). The basic methodology of PBL has been adapted to group work who performs as an R+D team within the company for solving the specific question presented by the company.
During the course the teams apply the theoretical knowledge for designing/selecting different alternatives gathering the required information through the mentor at the company. At the end of the course they have to present their proposals, including a marketing video, to the jury (posing as board of directors) composed by all the in company mentors. Results and conclusions: 89% of the students have evaluated this as their "best" learning experience allowing a great atmosphere for a successful competencies development both at the horizontal and transversal dimensions. All students obtain high grades and there is no need for additional evaluation methods. Drawing on the cognitive sciences and other disciplines, learning engineers are developing deeper conceptual understanding, discovering principles that govern learning, and showing in detail that Universities should avoid superficial knowledge favouring deeper knowledge acquisition. Companies are obtaining excellent proposals at a minimum cost and facilitating the informed recruitment of new employees which is in itself a powerful motivation for students.


Preparing students for life-long learning

Prof. Maria Knutson Wedel, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

TBD


What sort of Materials Education does Industry need?

Dr. Noel Rutter and Dr. Jess Gwynne, Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK

This interactive talk will discuss the needs of Materials students and “industry” (broadly defined). Using data gathered from current students, recent graduates and a range of employers, the typical undergraduate curriculum will be explored, seeking to discover the extent to which it is a good fit with the knowledge, understanding and skills that a Materials graduate will need. With that in mind, we will also consider the extent to which our assessment methods are fit for purpose.


Comparing educational goals and methods for teaching materials science in China and Western Europe

Prof. Sybrand van der Zwaag, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

While the subject of materials science is truly international and the concepts of metallurgy, polymer science, determination of properties and material behaviour are the same in Asia as in Western Europe, the way in which academic institutes think they can best be taught to engineering students, are rather different.
In this presentation we like to present a first overview of the similarities and differences in how to teach (and examine) materials science in both continents. The study will have a natural focus on the differences between our home institutions, but we will try and obtain relevant information from other universities in other countries too.


Design Education Program for Engineers at the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers

Dr Koichi Ohtomi, The University of Tokyo, Japan

The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) was founded in 1897 to "advance science and technology, and thereby contribute to the development of industries." Today, its membership exceeds 37,000, making it the nation's leading engineering society. The JSME holds the design education training program for engineers not only of academia but of industry named "Design Education basd on 1DCAE Concept" every six month since 2013. I mention the backgrand of this education program, the details and how to introduce "Material Selection in Mechanical Design" into this program. .


Teaching circular economy principles: how to introduce a mole in companies

Dr. Alexandre Mege-Revil and Dr. Amina Tandjaoui, Centrale Lille, France

Many citizens are aware of problems linked with petrol extraction and polymer recycling, but they usually do not realize that metals also exist in finite quantities. As a consequence, in the past few years many materials science teachers have added a few words at the end of their courses about environmental issues. This is also true of the main materials books that students are invited to read (8 really interesting pages at the end of Material Science & Engineering, 9th edition). Similarly, a few years ago, a sustainable development section has been developed in CES Edupack. However, environmental issues are seldom the central topic of our teaching, but are relegated to the far end.
This situation is prejudicial, as many students at the end of their cursus simply do not have a clue about how to put into practice the recycling and eco-design concepts they were taught. In this presentation, the authors would like to invite every materials science teacher to approach teaching as a means to make sure that when our engineering students are hired in a company they will actually take environmental issues into account. In other words, let us make sure future engineers will oppose any eco-unfriendly proposition they will encounter. The presentation will deal with available materials resources, at least four different meanings of “sustainable development” and finally with circular economy. We will share with the audience three ways we have experienced to make our students think about their approach to engineering: - a lecture on circular economy - a short project approach that runs the long road from retro engineering to conception, - a long project approach aiming at producing efficient low-tech devices, Finally, we will be happy to discuss our upcoming teaching project on metal recycling in the hope to improve it together.


A sweeter way of teaching health and safety

Dr. Julian Dean and Dr. Joanna Bates, University of Sheffield, UK

Hands-on experimental work promotes learning as it provides students with an opportunity to put the theory they have been taught into practice. Undertaking the practical work can include many hazards, each with an associated risk, whilst some are relatively minor others can be significant. Students will encounter these while they are working in the laboratory and, therefore, adequate instruction and training is required before students can carry out any of the work. Student engagement in the past with this process has been difficult due to the dryness of the material and the impatience of wanting to jump in and “get their hands dirty”.
Here we show how every students sweet tooth can be used to provide a starting point for them to engage with risk assessment, experimental design and to embed health and safety as part of their scientific culture In our “Danger-lab” we ask students to risk assess measuring the toughness of chocolate using a mini-Charpy impact tester. The danger in increased by asking the students to also dip the chocolate into liquid nitrogen then break, in order to observe the ductile to brittle transition. Once completed, students modify a basic experimental protocol and the following this do the experiment themselves. We have found that students have an increased awareness of hazards in a laboratory, a better understanding as to how to evaluate the risks associated with practical work and the process of putting control measures in place.


Schools Liaison: From Fantasy to Fact

Prof. George Smith, FRS, Emeritus Professor of Materials, Oxford University, UK

Working with schools is an essential first step towards producing the next generation of materials professionals. The Department of Materials at Oxford University has run an active schools liaison programme since the early 1990's. During that time, the number of first-choice applicants for our Materials degree course has increased by a factor of ten, from an initial all-time low of 15 to more than 150 in 2016. The success of this programme has arisen mainly from the abandonment of preconceptions about how such work should be done, the active engagement with front-line teachers in the formulation of strategies relevant to current school curricula, and the development of a range of attractive, hands-on courses for secondary school pupils and for their teachers. Although this is solely a UK based activity, the generic principles involved are believed to be more widely applicable.


Industry inspires education – education integrates industry

Assoc. Prof. Karen Pantleon, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark

Education in materials science and engineering is to a large extent multidisciplinary and relies on the interplay of competences from various fields, like mechanics, physics, chemistry, etc. When graduates finally apply their academic knowledge and professional skills gained from the education to promote technological progress for the benefit of the society in their jobs, for example, in industry, this again requires working across the disciplines and, in particular, it requires linking materials engineering with manufacturing technologies. To ensure that an education meets the demands of industry and does develop considering the permanent changing needs of a fast moving society, good communication and clarification of mutual expectations from education and industry is essential.
The MSc program Materials and Manufacturing Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) integrates not only materials and manufacturing technologies, but realizes also a lively and manifold interplay with industry on different levels of cooperation. Recent successful examples, which allowed students to integrate individual industrial experiences into their curricula and gain credit for their engagement, will be reported. While this part of the interplay, i.e. “education integrates industry”, obviously is of benefit for students and lecturers, the opposite direction, i.e. “industry inspires education”, requires careful prudence of the director of the MSc program to ensure inspiration rather than dictation. In the talk, it will be discussed how the MSc education in Materials and Manufacturing Engineering at DTU orients itself towards the requests of industry and considers its present and future challenges in the curriculum of the program. Successful interplay of education and industry finally relies on the capability of the university to offer an inclusive overall institutional frame, which - as will be demonstrated in the talk - is the case for DTU.


Composite selection for electronic packaging: case study and software development

Prof. Luc Salvo, University Grenoble Alpes, France

Electronic packaging in aeronautics are for the moment made in aluminium parts with pins. The set of requirements of such components require of course to extract heat from electronic device but also some electronic shielding as well as good behavior to vibrations. A general materials selection analysis using classical tools as CES indicate that composite materials could be good candidates to reduce weight of these components. The real set of requirements are given in terms of maximum temperature of the packaging and thus require a more detail analysis related to the shape of the component and composite architecture and material selection. Such an analysis is difficult to perform using CES for the moment so to answer to this problem a specific methodology was employed:
• Numerical simulation using COMSOL have been performed to obtained meta-model giving the maximum temperature of the packaging as a function of electronic power, heat exchange coefficient, thickness of packaging and composite thermal conductivities in the 3 directions.
• A specific tool written with MATLAB has been developed in order to be able to import these meta models and to perform easily a composite selection that allow to select the matrix, the volume fraction, the reinforcement as well as geometrical characteristic of the component. The methodology and the tool developed could be used in many kind of applications and are complementary to CES software. Furthermore this tool can be easily extent to other architectural structures such as sandwiches, foams, multilayer...


Strategy of Education on Materials for Students and Industry

Dr. Laura Katharina Thurn, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Strategy of Education on Materials for Students The properties of products do not only depend on the ingredients of the raw materials but on the entire production process as well. This is why the education of engineers should cover both, material science and manufacturing - with a focus on its interdependence. Traditionally, raw materials are made independently from the latter manufacturing. Consequently, the product properties do not wary too much as long as certain production rules are obeyed. New production technologies such as Additive Manufacturing (AM/3D Printing) act as a game changer, mainly because the properties of the final part result from the build parameters applied to the printer. Another big influence is time.
Traditionally, materials are mainly obtained from all kinds of mixing processes accompanied by long term heating and cooling while AM-processes make the material in situ which means in seconds. Our approach to materials education therefore is based on AM. The concept is to simultaneously teach manufacturing technology including the construction/operation of a 3D printer capable to process the complete range of thermoplastic materials and material science using the printer. In our concept the beginner-courses demonstrate the AM-process and the behavior of some sample materials. Next, students are integrated by assembly and operation of the printers for various materials and parameter sets. Results are evaluated in comparison to traditional produced ones by dimensional measuring, weighting, tensile test and analysis of scan data. .. and for Industry We literally bring the knowledge to the industry using a rolling Lab named “FabBus” (containing 11 Printers, 8 working places, computers and software). There we explain and demonstrate the material behavior to workers and technicians. At the conference we will present and demonstrate the entire program including the theoretical background and report our experience.


Inspire their desire - balanced learning with real industrial projects

Prof. Steffen Ritter, Reutlingen University, Germany

At Reutlingen University the collaboration with industry plays an essential role. Established as capstone courses in the curricula of the undergraduate and graduate programs of Mechanical Engineering there is more than a decade of experience on cooperative project based courses with industrial and research partners. The focus of these courses is mainly product development, with all its aspects from first concepts, material choices, design, calculations, detailing, prototyping and validation up to final production. Balanced leaning doesn´t mean to follow any specific learning or teaching format, it means to teach and learn to solve the given problem accordingly.
A mixture of classic frontal lecture, project based learning, problem based learning, e-learning… applied to the task will lead to a successful balanced learning strategy. The success factors for persistent, motivating and inspiring courses will be shown. From the acquisition of the right industrial partners, the choice of the right problem, the timing of the project, the evaluation of grades up to any other important aspect. Our role as teachers change from a mainly “input driven teaching style” to a “support giving coaching style”. Leading the students to ask the right questions or use the right tools at the right time of the project without solving the problems ourselves. At the same time we need to inspire and motivate the students to leave a positive connection to what we do as product developing engineers. A class wide open feedback culture is established, where teachers and industrial partners are allowed to give respectful open feedback. The students confirm in final evaluations the value of these industrial problem related all-embracing student projects. Compared to “classical” lectures these courses show significant improvement of what students think how much they have learned and how motivated they are to apply their knowledge. Let´s inspire their desire!


Creating the Advanced Manufacturing Workforce Industry Needs

Paul Eason, University of North Florida, USA

The University of North Florida is designated as a “regional” institution within the Florida State University System. Its primary focus is to the serve the needs of the region with respect to workforce education. While much of Florida’s economy is driven by tourism and agriculture, Northeast Florida’s economy is manufacturing heavy, and growing. Noting this trend, UNF sought state funding for the Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Innovation (AMMI) initiative. AMMI will allow UNF to create the infrastructure and faculty to deliver an industrially relevant Manufacturing Engineering program with emphasis on emerging materials and technologies graduates need to perform in high-tech industry and to attract more advanced manufacturing to the Northeast Florida region.
As the needs of industry rapidly change, accredited degree programs in traditional engineering programs are delivering skillsets established over half-century ago. This presentation will focus on the strategy to fund investment in reinventing the curricula and infrastructure in materials and manufacturing education, as well as the need to seek new funding strategies and partnerships to upgrade antiquated university infrastructure to match the changes in modern manufacturing. Establishing curricular needs with local industry leaders such as Medtronic, Mercedes-Benz, Saft, and Johnson & Johnson to name a few, UNF is poised to deliver an engineering education model uncommon to the US market. In addition UNF has partnered with Tescan to create state-of-the-art materials characterization facilities and with Shimadzu for materials testing facilities to educate students while supporting the R&D needs of industry. The successful strategy that will be presented capitalizes on the growing trend of public/private partnerships, in which private industry support is combined with government funding to maximize benefit to the public. The result is an evolving and relevant education in manufacturing and materials that gives students the knowledge and skills to excel in a modern manufacturing environment.


Learning Materials Engineering Inspired by Industry

Prof. Andy Horsewell, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark

University materials and manufacturing engineering courses can easily be inspired by technological advances in materials as seen in modern industrial products. Engineering students will relate to a demonstration of advances in materials and process selection used in, for example, Corning’s© Gorilla Glass™ for smart phones or Gillette’s© DLC coated and laser-welded blades for their razors. Compressive stresses in Gorilla Glass, which suppress crack growth, are introduced by ion exchange of potassium ions into sodium silicate glass; the science can be simply seen by an analysis of relative ion diameter from the Periodic Table, and then displayed using EduPack™.
In addition, surface defects are avoided in Gorilla Glass using trough casting in which the original cast surfaces are turned-in on themselves to the mid-plane of the glass panel; this is easily related to fracture mechanics considerations of the elimination of surface flaws in brittle materials. Gillette’s razor blades are DLC coated. The coated, thin stainless steel blade strip must be attached to an underlying support beam to achieve the required stiffness of the blade assembly. The joining process chosen is laser spot welding to minimize the size of the HAZ and avoid destruction of the DLC layer at the razor edge. All of this can be usefully analysed and evaluated in comparison to other materials and manufacturing process using EduPack. These modern industrial products, with hundreds of millions sold, have also shown considerable and continuous technology innovation from year to year. This keeps the educators and their students up-to-date and inspires an approach to materials and manufacturing engineering that is founded in a strong understanding of materials but also demands ambitious and on-going improvements to choice and development of materials and manufacturing processes… standard textbook material can easily become obsolete.


A Tale about a MOOC: Development and Running of an Analysis of Experimental Data Course

Prof. José Ygnacio Pastor, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain

”To err is human; to describe the error properly is sublime" Cliff Swartz, Physics Today 37 (1999), 388. Are your experimental results believable? Are they “accurate”? Can you handle all the numerical data around you? Are you going to develop a good product in your industry? To answer those questions, it is essential to have the right tools for a simple analytical insight of the results, while optimizing the measurement process. Engineering and science undergraduates perform routine error calculations in the physics laboratory towards this end.
Nevertheless, this knowledge is restricted to official university students. Hence, opening the understanding of these techniques to the entire world will be of a great interest. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have global reach, unlimited participation, and free access over the internet via a combination of social networking and video podcasts. Regarding those strengths, we have developed an Analysis of Experimental Data MOOC. This talk addresses the development, from the very beginning of this MOOC, as well as recommendations based on our experience, and on the research we conducted to prepare for our MOOC design on error quantification.


The Materials Library – Concept and Implementation in a Multidisciplinary Field

Prof. Dr.-Ing Gerhard Glatzel, Hochschule für Bildende Künste Braunschweig, Germany

The smell of cedar wood, the coolness of stainless steel, the texture of carbon laminates and the surprising abilities of smart materials are barely represented by material constants; these require the knowledge of nonlinear material models for their interpretation when materials are used beyond their conservative limits.
Sculptors and industrial designers want to experience the properties of materials or be inspired, arts scientists seek complementary information to their material narration while engineers want to touch the real stuff. The materials library at the Braunschweig School of Fine Arts serves as a source of information for students and researchers from all disciplines. It enables both the intuitive, senses oriented and the cognitive, parameter oriented approach to a wide range of materials and pre-products. Emotions are the key factor in the perception of products, consequently emotions must be considered in the choice of the best suited material during the design process. The materials library is an important link between the scientific engineering perception of materials with material parameters, production processes and typical uses and a craftman´s and artist´s perception.
It is the materialization of the methodological transdisziplinarity. In that sense the materials library is connected to the CAD-CAM-Lab. The CAD-CAM-Lab combines analogue with digital design and manufacturing processes. The concept of Iterative Design combines manual crafting with digital/virtual models through CNC manufacturing and reverse engineering. The duality or linking function of the „MatBibo“ is an important part of the praxis oriented teaching concept für materials. It enables both, the cognitive scientific systematic approach to material knowledge as classically used in engineering lectures and labs and the intuitive multisensoric approach in fine arts students classes.


“Materials Selection Criteria” full immersion: practicing materials selection with industry

Prof. Barbara Del Curto, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

The role played by materials and manufacturing technologies in industrial products has a relevant impact on designers, producers and users. Therefore, it is necessary to provide students with design methods and tools for a critical approach to the issue. In recent years, the collaboration between academic institutions and industrial partners has become an effective instrument for sharing materials knowledge and improve design process. The joint between university and industry has been useful to better involve students, which will become future professionals, increasing their experience in enterprise environment.
Within the “Materials Selection Criteria” course, in Design & Engineering Master Degree Programme at Politecnico di Milano, a hybrid methodology to teach materials selection to product design students has been developed. The approach consists of a theoretical framework of materials science and the introduction to the Ashby’s method of selection, through the integration in a full immersion experience cooperated together with an industrial partner.
Following the efficient “learning-by-doing” approach, the educational experience has the aim to practice the materials selection method in a real industrial context, focusing on technical and manufacturing properties of materials.
The full immersion consists of three different steps: the first one involves the partner factory tour and a briefing presentation before the practical experience. In the second step, following the Mike Ashby’s materials selection criteria, students examine a limited number of product’s components, exploring their function, constraints and objectives during two days. Finally, the last three days are dedicated to the design of an innovative product concept guided by materials selection.
In four years, the full immersion experience, which involved partners from lighting design, professional appliances and smart material suppliers, proves to be effective to involve students in the acquisition of materials selection skills.


Materials science for designing engineers, the evolution from abstract science to life time skills

Assoc. Prof. Frederic Veer, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Traditionally materials science has been taught as a science based course. Ten years ago the author started to transform his teaching from science based to CES EduPack based materials selection. In this 10 years design engineering has evolved with an accent on digital design and modelling. CES EduPack has also evolved. Evolving with these changes a new curriculum based on materials and processes focused problem solving skills and design optimisation has been developed. This is not designed to teach students temporary knowledge for an examination but life long critical engineering skills which they will use throughout their careers. The new curriculum is outlined and explained in relation to the other courses in the program to show the synergy that can be obtained.


Getting Inspired by Materials - Materials Selection from a Designer’s Perspective

Camilo Ayala Garcia, Dr. Valentina Rognoli, Dr. Luigi de Nardo, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

The process of selecting a material traditionally starts by addressing technical and engineering considerations. However, designers need to approach the process also in a different way, as usually they get inspired from a material instead of starting a proper selection process. In the first case the selection focuses on defining the limits related to properties and technical characteristics, while in the second the focus goes into characterizing the expressive-sensorial associations and perceptions of materials.
On this basis, Granta has developed a Products, Materials and Processes database to employ inside their software for materials selection. By doing so, it is allowing to choose any of the above mentioned paths depending on the necessities or opportunities that a designer or an engineer may deal with. We conducted a test inside a materials course in the Design School at Politecnico di Milano, to evaluate how this tool can help students to engage into the process of materials selection to develop a product. After introducing the materials selection methods and the basic materials properties and structural calculations, students were asked to select a commercial product from the fashion design field and perform the material selection supported by the database. The results of our investigation interacting with the database are presented here as a way to highlight the promising possibilities such tool provide as an instrument to select materials form another perspective.


DIY materials approach for materials education in product design

Camilo Ayala Garcia, Dr. Valentina Rognoli, Dr. Elvin Karana, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

The democratization of fabrication technologies, combined with the rising desire of individuals to personalize their products offers the opportunity to experiment with advanced, distributed and shared production processes, enabling self-production of materials and products. This has opened up new opportunities for product designers, who, in this case, act as active makers of materials instead of being passive recipients. In a recent publication, Rognoli et al. (2015) introduced this new practice in the design domain with the notion of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Materials. DIY materials are created through individual or collective self-production experiences, often by techniques and processes of the designer's own invention, as a result of a process of tinkering with materials. We argue that the ways these designers understand and make materials might bring new opportunities to both material and product development, to move from product design towards the design of product life cycle stages [2] where the materials play a fundamental role. Accordingly, we aim to bring DIY material thinking in design education. In this presentation, we will present our first attempts to engage students with this novel approach. ¬¬ [1] Rognoli V., Bianchini M., Maffei S., Karana E. (2015), DIY Materials, Materials & Design, 86. [2] Vezzoli, C. (2014), The “Material” Side of Design for Sustainability. In E. Karana, O. Pedgley, & V. Rognoli (Eds.), Materials experience: Fundamentals of materials and design (pp.135-143). Oxford, UK: Butterworth-Heinemann.


From STEM to STEAM: A Blueprint for a Transdisciplinary Research and Teaching Lab

Max Fickel, Royal College of Art, UK

Full title: From STEM to STEAM: A Blueprint for a Transdisciplinary Research and Teaching Lab in Materials, Engineering, and Design The threat of climate change represents an enormous challenge and ultimately demands a large scale transformation of society to find solutions to the extreme complex and highly interdependent problem types immanent. In this context, sustainable technologies are necessary but not a sufficiency. Recent scientific reports argue that technology alone will probably not meet the demanding targets. Therefore, significant changes in behaviour are needed at the same time. In this context, the arts, and especially product design, gain their importance: In contrast to engineering, they focus on emotive experience thereby establishing a relationship between the user and the product exceeding the pure functional application.
However, to introduce sustainable technologies in large scale, as the relevant systems are highly interdependent, development efforts must not only partially focus on technical systems and consumers independently, but more importantly, also on the interplay and interlinkages between those. This means that the entire socio-technical framework has to be considered simultaneously in a true transdisciplinary approach. Although in product development industrial design does belong among the engineer’s most important partners, there are still preventable difficulties hindering efficient collaboration across the domains. This article reports on recent findings from a research project at the Royal College of Art, London. In particular it describes novel methods and tools for transdisciplinary collaboration and knowledge exchange in materials, engineering and design and incorporates the findings in a proposal for a transdisciplinary research and teaching lab.